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Friday, 29 August 2014

International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances 2014, 30 August.




Disappeared Persons V. Missing Persons


The enforced disappearance of individuals by States constitutes an unacceptable violation of human rights. Acts tantamount to enforced disappearance of individuals by armed and terrorist groups also constitutes a gross abuse of human rights. This abhorrent practice places people outside the protection of the law, and thus potentially in great danger of physical violence and sometimes barbaric execution. In addition to causing unimaginable worry and anguish for the victims and their loved ones, this creates a generalized climate of fear and terror across entire societies.

Enforced disappearance was once employed mainly by military dictatorships. Increasingly it has become a tool of many States around the world -- some operating under counter-terror strategies, or fighting organized crime, and others seeking to quash dissent and human rights activism.

On this solemn day, I reiterate in the strongest possible terms that under international law, no one should be kept in secret detention. Any person deprived of his or her liberty must be held safely in officially recognized and supervised locations that observe the rule of law. States should provide full information about the whereabouts of persons who have been disappeared. And they must effectively implement the right to the truth, justice and reparation for all victims and their families. Enforced disappearance is a practice that cannot be tolerated in the 21st Century.

To date, the International Convention for the Protection of all Persons from Enforced Disappearance, which entered into force in December 2010, has been signed by 93 States and ratified by 43. It provides a sound foundation for fighting impunity, protecting disappeared persons and their families and strengthening the guarantees provided by the rule of law -- including investigation, justice and redress.

I urge all Member States to sign and ratify the Convention without delay. It is time for the universal ratification of the Convention and a final end to all enforced disappearances.

International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances Saturday 30 August 2014. Remove all obstacles to aid search for the disappeared, UN experts urge governments 

GENEVA (30 August 2014) –Two United Nations expert groups on enforced disappearances call on States “to remove all obstacles” to aid investigations into the fate of disappeared persons. On the International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances, the Committee on Enforced Disappearances and the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances urge Governments to support relatives of the disappeared by removing all obstacles hindering their search for loved ones, including through the opening of all archives, especially military files.

 “More than 43,000 cases, the majority dating back decades, remain outstanding with the United Nations Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances. These cases stay open for several reasons, often because relatives have no support in finding out what happened.

The search for disappeared family members and, in many cases, the identification of discovered remains, is always the most pressing request of relatives who endure tremendous suffering in their long wait to know the fate or whereabouts of their loved ones.

 Many relatives face unjustified hurdles in their search, due to the lack of political will, or insufficient and inadequate investigations.

The recent reunion of Estela de Carlotto, president of the Argentine human rights organisation Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, with her grandson after a 36-year search shows that with good will, cooperation and commitment, a positive outcome is possible, even many years after a disappearance occurs.

 Transparency and information-sharing is a good demonstration of political will, so we call on States to immediately open all archives, including military files, as these sometimes contain information relating to the whereabouts of disappeared persons.

 States should ensure that relatives, their representatives and all persons with a legitimate interest in finding out what happened have full and prompt access to national, regional and international mechanisms aimed at establishing the truth on the disappearances. This does not just mean removing obstacles to accessing these mechanisms, but actively promoting and facilitating their use.

 It is also essential to expand the use of forensic expertise and DNA testing and make adequate use of all the available technological and scientific techniques.

 The International Convention for the Protection of All Persons against Enforced Disappearance is clear: families and friends of a disappeared person are themselves victims and they have the right to know the truth regarding the circumstances of the enforced disappearance, the progress and results of the investigation, and ultimately the fate of the disappeared person.

 For this reason, the Committee on Enforced Disappearances encourages Governments, whenever appropriate, to set up ad hoc bodies and specialized units to investigate cases of enforced disappearance and to create national DNA banks to hold genetic samples of all cases reported.

 The time for promises has passed. Now it is the time to act. States must urgently address the anguish of the relatives of the disappeared and reinvigorate their investigations into cases of disappearances. We owe it to the disappeared and to their families and friends who wake up every day, hoping to know the fate and whereabouts of their loved ones.” ENDS

 Resources :

 For more information, log on to:
 Working Group on Disappearance,
Committee on Enforced Disappearances,
 Read the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance,
 Timetable of reports due under article 29.1 of the International Convention for the protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance
 

External links
 
Treaty Body Webcast
Amnesty International
Human Rights Watch
International Federation for Human Rights
International Coalition Against Enforced Disappearances
TRIAL
World Organisation Against Torture

 FORUM AND DISCUSSIONS :



  Information and media requests :
  For more information and media requests, please contact:
 Ugo Cedrangolo (+41 22 917 9286 / ucedrangolo@ohchr.org)
or write to wgeid@ohchr.org Maria Giovanna Bianchi (+41 22 917 9189 / mgbianchi@ohchr.org)
or write to ced@ohchr.org


 

Thursday, 28 August 2014

International Day against Nuclear Tests 2014, August 29th

International Day against Nuclear Tests, August 29th
Día Internacional contra los Ensayos Nucleares, 29 de Augusto
Journée internationale contre les essais nucléaires, 29 Août.
禁止核试验国际日, 29月8日.
 Международный день действий против ядерных испытаний, 29 августа.
 اليوم الدولي لمناهضة التجارب النووية، , 29 آب/أغسطس

Internationa Day Against Nuclear Test, 29 august 2014
Today is a reminder that the world is united against the devastating effects of nuclear testing on the lives of people and the environment. It’s a reminder that the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) must enter into force. The CTBT not only closes the door on nuclear testing -- it is a critical step towards the elimination of nuclear weapons. CTBTO Executive Secretary Lassina Zerbo

 According to the resolution establishing it, the International Day against Nuclear Tests aims to prevent more of the “devastating and harmful effects on the lives and health of people and the environment” caused by nuclear testing. Over 2,000 Nuclear Tests have been conducted since the very first nuclear explosion, the Trinity test on 16 July 1945 in New Mexico, United States. Together, the fallout from these tests dwarfed the amount of radioactivity released into the environment from any nuclear accident.

 Currently 183 States have signed the Treaty and 162 have ratified it (see interactive map). However for the CTBT to enter into force, eight States - from a list of 44 defined as nuclear technology holders - have yet to ratify to meet the Treaty’s stringent entry into force requirement: China, DPRK, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan and the United States.






On this day in 1991, Kazakhstan closed the nuclear test site near Semipalatinsk. On that same date in 1949, the Soviet Union conducted its first nuclear test, followed by another 455 nuclear tests over succeeding decades, with a terrible effect on the local population and environment.
These tests and the hundreds more that followed in other countries became hallmarks of a nuclear arms race, in which human survival depended on the doctrine of mutually assured destruction, known by its fitting acronym, MAD.
As Secretary-General, I have had many opportunities to meet with some of the courageous survivors of nuclear weapons and nuclear tests in Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Semipalatinsk. Their resolve and dedication should continue to guide our work for a world without nuclear weapons. 
On this International Day against Nuclear Tests, let us all take a fresh look at those survivors’ stories.  Listen to their words and imagine the effects of these detonations as if they were experienced by each of us.  Only then can we can better understand the imperative to renew our commitment to a world free of nuclear weapons and nuclear tests.
I wish to appeal particularly to citizens of those States that have not yet ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), especially the eight remaining Annex 2 States whose ratification is required for the Treaty’s entry into force: China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan and the United States.
Together, let us demand an end to all nuclear tests, get on with the unfinished business of achieving a world free of nuclear weapons, and usher in a safer and more prosperous future.
Ban Ki-moon



On this International Day Against Nuclear Tests, the international community reaffirms its commitment to secure the entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), which would prohibit all nuclear explosions. This would mark a welcome step toward a world without nuclear weapons. The CTBT has already made real progress toward achieving universal membership – more than 90 percent of UN Member States have signed the Treaty and 162 countries have ratified it. Eight states must ratify the Treaty in order for it to enter into force: China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan and the United States of America. I urge those states to act without further delay. I also call on all countries to refrain from nuclear tests, the use of new nuclear weapons technologies or any action that would defeat the object and purpose of the CTBT. We have recently witnessed a substantial growth of interest in better understanding the catastrophic humanitarian effects of nuclear weapons. Decades ago, awareness of the human and environmental consequences of nuclear detonations led to the global ban on nuclear tests. Today, the effects of nuclear weapons upon civilian populations, agriculture, livestock and ground-water supplies are better known and well documented. They have contributed significantly to our collective efforts towards achieving the prohibition and elimination of all nuclear weapons for all time. Together, let us demand an end to all nuclear tests and get on with the unfinished business of achieving a world free of nuclear weapons.
 Ban Ki-moon 



On 29 August 1949, the first nuclear device was detonated at the Semipalatinsk test range in Kazakhstan. 60 years later, the United Nations General Assembly, in its resolution 64/37, declared 29 August as the International Day against Nuclear Tests, a day devoted to enhancing public awareness and education about the effects of nuclear weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions and for highlighting the need for their cessation as one of the means of achieving the goal of a nuclear-weapon-free world.
Due to their massive power of destruction, the use of nuclear weapons would have catastrophic global consequences and would cause severe and long-lasting emergencies –  humanitarian, global health, climate, social order, human development, and economic. Access to social goods and services is predicated on the existence of peace and security. Development goals can only be achieved if we prevent such catastrophes on our planet. This must be a collective effort, because we face the risks posed by these weapons collectively, not as States with narrow national security interests.
As President of the 68th session of the General Assembly, I will mark this important international day by convening an informal meeting of the plenary of the General Assembly on 10 September 2014. I invite you to commemorate the International Day against Nuclear Tests with me to renew our commitment for the promotion of peace and security, one of the main purposes and principles of our United Nations.
John W. Ashe


2014 Events 

INFORMAL MEETING OF THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY TO MARK THE OBSERVANCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL DAY AGAINST NUCLEAR TESTS

Programme

The Meeting is convened by H.E. Mr. John Ashe, President of the United Nations General Assembly, and organized in cooperation with the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Kazakhstan.
 
Date:  Wednesday, 10 September 2014
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Venue: Trusteeship Council, United Nations Headquarters

Opening Statements by:
  • H.E. Mr. John Ashe, President of the United Nations General Assembly
  • H.E. Mr. Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations
  • H.E. Mr. Ermek Kosherbayev,  First Deputy of the Governor of Eastern Kazakhstan (Semipalatinsk region)
High-Level Interactive Panel on the Path to Zero: The Role of the United Nations in Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation

The official opening ceremony will be followed by a High-Level Panel on the above theme. The panelists are expected to cover some key issues, including necessary steps for further progress on nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, the establishment of nuclear-weapon-free zones, confidence building and other relevant issues.
 
Panel Details  
Moderator
H.E. Ambassador U. Joy Ogwu, Permanent Representative of Nigeria to the United Nations
Speakers
  • Ms. Angela Kane, High Representative for Disarmament Affairs, United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs
  • H.E. Ambassador Libran Cabactulan, Permanent Representative of Philippines to the United Nations
  • H.E. Ambassador Guillermo  Rishchynski, Permanent Representative of Canada to the United Nations
  • Mr. Geoffrey Shaw, Representative of the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency to the United Nations
The panel will be followed by observations and questions from Member States.

Entry

The Informal Meeting is open to all diplomats, think-tanks, the academic community, civil society and the media. Those without a UN Grounds Pass interested in these events should kindly contact: itilegen@yahoo.com,
or tel: 1-212-2301900, ext 322.

Resources :

Since the International Day against Nuclear Tests was first declared, there have been a number of significant developments, discussions and initiatives relevant to its goals and objectives as well as conferences convened to elaborate and advance these developments.


Monday, 18 August 2014

World Humanitarian Day 2014, 19 August

 

2014年的主题:世界需要更多
Тема Дня 2014 года: «Миру нужно больше...»



On World Humanitarian Day, we renew our commitment to life-saving relief efforts -- and we remember all those who died serving this noble cause. Last year, more humanitarian workers were kidnapped, seriously injured or killed than ever before. This is an outrage.
In recent weeks, dozens of humanitarians -- including members of the UN family -- have lost their lives in South Sudan and Gaza. Too many people have died or suffered from deliberate attacks.
Humanitarian workers and their families are hit hardest by these crimes.
But they are also felt by millions of others.
Attacks on humanitarian workers hinder the ability of people in desperate need to receive lifesaving assistance.
Children go unvaccinated. Sick and wounded patients go untreated. Those forced from their homes are left without food, water or shelter – exposed to violence, disease or other threats.
On World Humanitarian Day, we honour the heroic aid workers who rush bravely to help people in need.
We remember their sacrifices, and we recognize the millions of people who count on humanitarian workers for their very survival.
Let us honour the fallen by protecting those who carry on their work – and supporting humanitarian relief operations worldwide.

Ban Ki-moon







As part of this year's World Humanitarian Day activities, a brand new online community called "Messengers of Humanity" was launched on July 31, 2014.
Messengers of Humanity is a platform for global advocates to stand up for humanity by amplifying a generation’s call for a better world.
As a Messenger of Humanity, you will receive the latest advocacy campaigns from humanitarian organisations working with their call to action that you can share on your social networks and amplify the message.
for more information, read the FAQ PDF document or visit the official page.





Events

 Remember the fallen : A wreath-laying ceremony to commemorate the eleventh anniversary of the Baghdad bombing (organized by the United Nations Staff Union) will be held on Tuesday, 19 August 2014, at 09:30 a.m. EST, in the Secretariat Building South Lobby. The ceremony will be streamed live on UN Webcast.




19 Aug 2014 - Remarks by Mr. Jan Eliasson, United Nations Deputy Secretary-General during the meeting of the Security Council on the Protection of civilians in armed conflict on the occasion of World Humanitarian Day (19 August). 


19 Aug 2014 - Remarks by Mr. Peter Maurer, President of the International Committee of the Red Cross (from Geneva) during the meeting of the Security Council on the Protection of civilians in armed conflict on the occasion of World Humanitarian Day (19 August).



19 Aug 2014 - Remarks by Mr. Masood Karakhail, Director and Co-Founder of the Liaison Office, during the meeting of the Security Council on the Protection of civilians in armed conflict on the occasion of World Humanitarian Day (19 August).

  

Resources :

 Join the forum : World Humanitarian Day 2014, The World needs more ...

 This year the UN and its humanitarian partners continue their ground-breaking campaign called The world needs more… which is the first-of-its-kind project that turns words into aid

HUMAN SECURITY UNIT Strategic Plan 2014-2017

Monday, 11 August 2014

International Youth Day 2014, August 12th.

 


2014 International Youth Day: Youth and Mental Health.
Темой Международного дня молодежи 2014 года является «Молодежь и психическое здоровье».
 Tema 2014:«Los jóvenes y salud mental».
 Thème de la Journée 2014 : « Les jeunes et la santé mentale ».
 وموضوع اليوم الدولي للشباب لعام 2014 هو "الشباب والصحة النفسية".


Have Your Say on Youth Mental Health



 ǀ Français ǀ Español ǀ (pdf)

A new publication from the United Nations shows that 20 per cent of the world’s young people experience a mental health condition each year.  The risks are especially great as they transition from childhood to adulthood.  Stigma and shame often compound the problem, preventing them from seeking the support they need.  For this year’s observance of International Youth Day, the United Nations wants to help lift the veil that keeps young people locked in a chamber of isolation and silence.
The barriers can be overwhelming, particularly in countries where the issue of mental health is ignored and there is a lack of investment in mental health services.  Too often, owing to neglect and irrational fear, persons with mental health conditions are marginalized not only from having a role in the design and implementation of development policies and programmes but even from basic care.  This leaves them more vulnerable to poverty, violence and social exclusion, and has a negative impact on society as a whole.
Young people who are already considered vulnerable, such as homeless youth, those involved in the juvenile justice system, orphaned youth and those having experienced conflict situations, are often more susceptible to stigma and other barriers, leaving them even more adrift when they are most in need of support.  Let us remember that with understanding and assistance, these young people can flourish, making valuable contributions to our collective future.
We have just about 500 days to reach the Millennium Development Goals.  We must support all young people, especially those who are vulnerable, to succeed in this historic campaign.
Wide-ranging efforts at all levels are needed to raise awareness about the importance of investing in and supporting young people with mental health conditions.  Increased education is crucial in reducing stigma and in changing how we talk about and perceive mental health.
Mental health is how we feel; it is our emotions and well-being.  We all need to take care of our mental health so that we lead satisfying lives.  Let us begin to talk about our mental-health in the same way we talk about our overall health.
As we mark International Youth Day 2014, let us enable youth with mental health conditions to realize their full potential, and let us show that mental health matters to us all.

Ban Ki-moon

Statement

11 August 2014

Statement of the Executive Director, UNFPA

International Youth Day, 12 August 2014 “Mental Health Matters”
French | Spanish | Russian | Arabic
A safe and healthy passage from adolescence into adulthood is the right of every child. Being healthy means not merely the absence of illness, but complete physical, mental and social well-being. An essential component of this is being able to realize one’s potential, cope with the stresses of life, build healthy relationships, work productively and participate fully in society. Yet, the mental health of young people is largely ignored and, as a result, depression is the largest cause of disability, and suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young people worldwide. On this International Youth Day, we declare, ‘Mental Health Matters’!
On their journey to adulthood, adolescents discover who they are, what they aspire to and the risks they face. They come to terms with how their identities relate to those around them and learn to deal with social expectations. Facing stigma and discrimination due to gender, sexuality, HIV, disability or other status can make this passage especially challenging. It is critically important for adolescents to have supportive relationships with teachers, role models and mentors, so that they can emerge into adulthood with positive self-esteem and self-value.
Across the world, 1 in 4 adolescent girls are sexually assaulted and 1 in 3 young women were married before the age of 18. The situation is even worse for millions of adolescents living in areas of conflict or humanitarian crises. When adolescents are prevented from having control over their physical and mental integrity, it has severe consequences for their mental health. The resulting post-traumatic stress disorders and depression multiply the injustice they face and add to the burden of unwanted pregnancies, HIV infection or unsafe abortions. Early exposure to trauma and adversity is an established preventable risk factor for mental disorders.
Being able to access health services is essential for all young people. Yet, young people living with mental health disabilities are prevented from getting the care and treatment they require. Those admitted to psychiatric institutions often face degrading treatment and inhuman living conditions. All young people, but particularly those with mental disabilities, are excluded from community life and denied the opportunity to participate in decision-making that affects their lives. Many young people with mental disabilities are denied the right to vote, marry and have children, affecting their ability to gain access to appropriate care, integrate into society and recover from their illnesses.
Mental health matters, and the international community has much to do to fulfil its obligations to young people. We must ensure the availability of services to prevent, diagnose and treat mental health conditions. We must end the stigma, discrimination and violations of human rights against people with mental disabilities. We must guarantee a safe and healthy passage through adolescence for all.
UNFPA is working in more than 150 countries and territories around the world to ensure that adolescents and youth have the knowledge, skills and services to enable them to exercise their rights, understand their bodies, and make informed decisions about their health and well-being. Through the Action for Adolescent Girls initiative, we are focusing on their health, safety, education, engagement and empowerment. When adolescent girls have knowledge, self-esteem, confidence, friends, mentors and health services, they are more able to exercise their rights. Most importantly, we are making sure young people’s voices and priorities are incorporated in development plans and policies.
- See more at: http://www.unfpa.org/public/cache/offonce/home/news/pid/18102;jsessionid=513E984B84D537F2B6F06A5A80EE5F72.jahia01#sthash.KBZ6I6Je.dpuf
Mental Health Matter - International Youth Day 2014


Youth is a period of dramatic change, and the journey from childhood to adulthood can be complex, raising a host of mental health issues.
 
The theme of this International Youth Day is “ Youth and Mental Health,” under the motto Mental Health Matters. This is an opportunity to raise awareness about the difficulties facing young women and men, including from stigma and discrimination, and to support them so that they can fully achieve their aspirations.

Guided by an Operational Strategy on Youth (2014-2021), UNESCO focusses on the needs of ma rginalized young women and men to promote their full integration into society. We work to support school health programmes, as well as informal and non-formal learning, and by mobilizing the power of information and communication technologies.
At the wider level, we are committed to promoting inclusive integrated policies on youth, in which all youth voices are meaningfully consulted and engaged. In all this, we seek to provide opportunities for young people to develop the skills and competences necessary to transition to adulthood and to make the most of all opportunities offered by societies that are increasingly diverse and undergoing transformation.

This requires seeing young women and men not as objects of policy but as agents of change. It calls for action to promote intergenerational under standing and partnership, to strengthen solidarity and to ensure the full integration of all young women and men in society and the economy. In crafting new policies, we need to draw upon lessons learnt and listen to the needs of young people so as to help them overcome the challenges they face The mental health of young women and men is important for the health of society as a whole. They are a well spring of ideas for innovation and leaders for positive change.We need to support them in every way in order to build with them inclusive,just--and healthy--societies.

Irina Bokova


Statement of the Executive Director, UNFPA on the occasion of the International Youth Day, 12 August 2014 “Mental Health Matters”

UNFPA is working in more than 150 countries and territories around the world to ensure that adolescents and youth have the knowledge, skills and services to enable them to exercise their rights, understand their bodies, and make informed decisions about their health and well-being. Through the Action for Adolescent Girls initiative, we are focusing on their health, safety, education, engagement and empowerment. When adolescent girls have knowledge, self-esteem, confidence, friends, mentors and health services, they are more able to exercise their rights. Most importantly, we are making sure young people’s voices and priorities are incorporated in development plans and policies.


 

From 12 June until International Youth Day on 12 August, the United Nations is running a campaign to draw awareness to the importance of reducing stigma surrounding youth with mental health conditions. We need you to help raise awareness and reduce the shame. Join us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest to help raise awareness! Use hashtags #MentalHealthMatters and#UN4Youth.

 IYD2014 Map of Events
 
 Join the Forum : Have Your Say on Youth Mental Health, International Youth Day is on August 12 each year.




Today, more than ever, young women and men are change-makers, building new realities for themselves and their communities. All over the world, youth are driving social change and innovation, claiming respect for their fundamental human rights and freedoms, and seeking new opportunities to learn and work together for a better future.

UNESCO recognizes this reality, and therefore prioritizes its work with and for youth across all its programmes. The Organization is guided in this by an Operational Strategy on Youth (2014-2021), which is the result of a long process of review and consultation, engaging both young people and Member States. This serves both to consolidate and innovate UNESCO’s action for youth.


What is the UNESCO Strategy on Youth?

The Strategy covers a period of eight years, from 2014 to 2021, and provides the framework for constructive partnerships to be developed with and between youth organizations and youth-related stakeholders. It is built on the premise that youth are key partners and actors for development and peace.

The Strategy puts forward three multidisciplinary and complementary axes of work which incorporate the full range of UNESCO’s expertise in education, culture, natural, social and human sciences, and communication and information:

1. Policy formulation and review with the participation of youth.
Axis 1 - Policy formulation and review with the participation of youth - UNESCO Operational  Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.
Axis 2 - Capacity development for the transition to adulthood - UNESCO Operational  Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.
Axis 3 - Civil engagement, democratic participation and social innovation - UNESCO Operational  Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.



The implementation of the UNESCO Operational Strategy on Youth is also guided by the recommendations produced at the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum (UNESCO Paris, France, 29-31 October 2013).

Read the Outcome Document of the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum


UNESCO Operational Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.

 Events :
A celebration of International Youth Day will in the ECOSOC Chamber, UNHQ, from 10:30am-1:30pm on 12 August, 2014.
The event is co-organized by UN DESA’s Division for Social Policy and Development and the Office of the Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth.
The event will bring together young people, youth organizations, Member State representatives, civil society, and UN entities to discuss the issue of youth and mental-health in particular looking at issues such as the impact of stigma, discrimination and exclusion, on the local, country, and international levels.

How to participate?
Register for the event here
Watch the event live.

How to commemorate International Youth Day?

To commemorate the Day, you are encouraged to organize events or activities in your community.
  • Organize
    Hold forums, public discussions and information campaigns in support of young people, focusing on strengthening partnerships with and for young people.
  • Celebrate
    Plan and organize performances to showcase and celebrate how youth contribute to the societies in which they live, and how everyone, through partnerships with and for youth, can build a better world.
  • Map Events
    Are you planning an activity to mark International Youth Day 2014 in your community? Send details to youth@un.org and your event may be added to our world map of events.
  • Follow us
    Twitter: @UN4Youth
    Facebook: facebook.com/UN4Youth

Friday, 8 August 2014

International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples 2014, 9 August




 
Aboriginal People are a steady beating heart at the centre of our Australian Spiritual Identity.

2014 Theme: "Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples"
Тема в 2014 году: «Преодоление разрыва: осуществление прав коренных народов» 
2014年主题:“弥补差距:落实土著人民的权利”
Thème 2014 : « Combler le fossé : appliquer des droits des peuples autochtones »
Tema 2014: «Acortando las diferencias: aplicación de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas»
موضوع 2014: "سد الفجوة: تنفيذ حقوق الشعوب الأصلية"



This year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples comes at a critical moment as the world endeavours to meet the Millennium Development Goals, forge a new vision for sustainable development and prepare the groundwork for the adoption of a new legal climate agreement – all by 2015.
Indigenous peoples have a central interest in these objectives – and can act as powerful agents of progress. In order for them to contribute to our common future, we must secure their rights.
The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples establishes minimum standards for their survival, dignity, well-being and rights. But huge gaps remain between those ideals and the circumstances facing most of the world’s indigenous peoples.
While a number of countries have constitutional and legislative frameworks that recognize indigenous peoples, many others do not, leaving their lives and lands exposed to threats. Historical injustices have all too often resulted in exclusion and poverty.  Power structures have and continue to create obstacles to indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination. They are among those who tend to face comparatively higher barriers to progress. The negative effects reverberate beyond indigenous communities, affecting societies as a whole.
The interests of the indigenous peoples must be part of the new development agenda in order for it to succeed.
As we prepare for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in September, I urge all Member States to work in full partnership with indigenous peoples and their representatives to improve their lives and opportunities.

Together, let us recognize and celebrate the valuable and distinctive identities of indigenous peoples around the world. Let us work even harder to empower them and support their aspirations.
On this International Day for the World’s Indigenous Peoples, I call on all partners to join the United Nations in promoting and protecting their rights which are essential for our common future.


Ban Ki-moon

 

 Remarks By H.E. Mr. Crispin Gregoire Special Advisor to the President On behalf of H.E. Mr. John W. Ashe President of the 68 th Session of the United Nations General Assembly.International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2014

“Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples”
New York, 8 August 2014.

Excellencies,Distinguished Delegates, Vice-Chairperson of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Under-Secretary General of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs,Director of the Division for Social Policy and Development,

Special Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

On behalf of the President of the General Assembly, I have the great honour to join the world community to day in commemorating this year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. This worthy tradition dates back to 1994 and was renewed by our Assembly of nations in resolution 59/174 as part of efforts to strengthen international cooperation to support indigenous people in areas such as human rights, the environment, development, education and health.
With the Second International Decade of the World's Indigenous People coming to a close and the World Conference on Indigenous People’s rapidly approaching, this year carries particular importance and significance.

Excellencies, Two historic decades have passed since the Vienna Declaration and they have been an important testament to the struggles and achievements of indigenous peoples. The first decade saw a number of accomplishments, including: United Nations entities, Member States, and Indigenous Peoples’organizations working together to advance the rights of indigenous peoples; the establishment of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; the appointment by the Human Rights Commission of the Special Rapporteur; and demonstrated effectiveness by Indigenous Peoples to ensuring that indigenous issues are inserted into a number of international settings.

During the course of the Second Decade, wehave witnessed the historic adoption by the General Assembly of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,continuous mobilization by Indigenous Peoples towards more effective articulation of their plight and challenges, as well as decisive steps by some governments and international organisations to accord greater attention to the rights and improved well-being of Indigenous Peoples.

As we observe this year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples,in the final and crucial year of this second decade, we hearken back to past achievements and prepare for
the future action that is necessary to realize our commitments. This year’s focus, “ bridging the gap through implementing the rights of Indigenous Peoples” is an apt reminder that there is still a long way to go in the journey towards the concerted and decisive action required to address the rights of Indigenous Peoples.In this regard, it is not just the gap between the indigenous and the non-indigenous withincountries that needs to be bridged at an accelerated pace,but the gap between the promise of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (A/Res/61/295) and the reality of its implementation.

The first “World Conference on Indigenous Peoples” to be held on the 22nd and the 23rd of September this year marks an important milestonein our efforts.In the preparation for the World Conference, the President is working closely with Indigenous Peoples and Member States to ensure that this seminal event will be a success.
Along with his four Advisers, two from Member States and two from Indigenous Peoples, he is committed to ensuring that the World Conference brings about real and effective change for the benefit of all Indigenous Peoples. He is pleased to inform that the team is working hard on preparing a clear, concise and action-oriented outcome document that will hopefully serve as a robust platform for enhanced cooperation between Member States and Indigenous Peoples.

Distinguished Guests, The historical marginalization of indigenous peoples is still an unfortunate reality in today’s world and in many places, daunting obstacles are a part of daily life.
As the preamble of the Alta Document so eloquently lays out, past injustices have led to current challenges. This preamble further reaffirms that the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should be the foundation of all our efforts moving forward. Yet,its value will remain severely limited if words are not followed up with deeds, and theories are not put into practice. 
Through the three pillars of engagement–the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples;the United Nations has undertaken important steps towards greater recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples. What is required now is more decisive action at international and national levels to ensure the full implementation of the provisions of the Declaration. Our commemoration today is both a prelude and a bridge to the World Conference. I hope that the Outcome Document we ultimately adopt this September will serve to consolidate the achievements of the past as well as stimulate efforts for the future.

On this International Day, let me salute the Indigenous Peoples of the world and express my fervent hope that the international community will work steadfastly with you towards the realization of your inalienable rights as enshrined in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

May this Day be both a reaffirmation of the international community ’s solidarity with you, as well as an important opportunity to lay the found ation for the Conference next month.

Thank you.

***

Message of Dr Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director, UN WomenInternational Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2014.

Today, August 8, is the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. On behalf of UN Women, I join with people around the world in commending and commemorating the achievements and struggles of indigenous peoples.

This year’s theme is Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples. This is particularly relevant to indigenous women and girls. In their struggle for equality, they have
shown their diverse capacities as human rights defenders, decision makers and implementers, despite discrimination and marginalization.

The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues estimates that there are 370 million indigenous peoples living in more than 90 countries across the world. Imagine how much more women in all these countries could contribute if they had equal opportunities to realize their full potential. UN Women applauds the focus on this issue, as global leaders embark on determining the sustainable development framework. We join indigenous peoples around the world in calling for the full implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples — the comprehensive blueprint for addressing the inequalities and discrimination that indigenous communities have faced for centuries.

In October 2013, indigenous women’s organizations and individuals came together with UN Women and other partners in Lima, Peru, to adopt the Lima Position and Plan of Action. It calls
for urgent, concerted efforts to address challenges facing indigenous women in many parts of the world: persistent violence, poverty, discrimination, racism, and limited access to services
and productive resources. The Plan of Action also calls for indigenous women’s full and equal participation in decision-making at all levels.

These principles and values inform UN Women’s work with indigenous women and their communities around the world. We also work closely with indigenous women's organizations through our Civil Society Advisory Groups. This celebration of the International Day is just the start of an important new epoch in progress.

It is our hope that the international community will keep its promises to indigenous women and girls and take measures that fulfill their aspirations for equality, freedom, and justice.

Message of Francis Gurry, Director General, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) on the occasion of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People, August 9, 2014.


Indigenous Peoples’ knowledge and cultures contribute to the richness of the world’s innovation and creativity. Their traditional practices contribute to equitable development and proper management of the environment. Indigenous Peoples’ traditional knowledge (TK) and traditional cultural expressions (TCEs) are essential for the affirmation of their distinct cultural identity.

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) leads the development of a balanced and effective international intellectual property system that enables innovation and creativity for the benefit of all. Intellectual property can play a key role in the economic, social and cultural empowerment of Indigenous Peoples. The WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore (IGC) is currently working to reach agreement on an international legal instrument or instruments which will ensure the effective protection of TK and TCEs, and regulation of the interface between intellectual property and genetic resources. Indigenous Peoples and local communities are important actors in achieving a universal intellectual property system which further recognizes all forms of innovation and creativity and safeguards the unique status and identity of Indigenous Peoples.

This year’s theme for the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples: “Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples”, viewed in an intellectual property context, makes a direct reference to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, particularly Article 31, which refers to the “right of indigenous peoples to maintain, control, protect and develop their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expression”. Article 31 contributes to providing guidance to WIPO’s work on the protection of TK and TCEs.

WIPO Member States have established several mechanisms for Indigenous Peoples and local communities to make substantive contributions to the WIPO negotiations. Representatives of Indigenous Peoples and local communities participate directly – and very valuably - in these negotiations.

WIPO’s capacity-strengthening activities also address the interests and concerns of Indigenous Peoples and local communities, including our practical workshop for Indigenous Peoples and local communities on intellectual property and TK. WIPO’s Indigenous Fellow Program offers the opportunity for an Indigenous Fellow to work within WIPO’s Traditional Knowledge Division.
It is with deep appreciation and respect that the WIPO joins today in celebrating the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples and we look forward to maintaining our valuable and warm collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and local communities.”

Message from Ms Irina Bokova,Director-General of UNESCO on the occasion of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People 9 August 2014.



In September, the United Nations General Assembly will hold the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples. This will review progress towards the fulfilment of indigenous peoples’ rights, and efforts to implement the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
 
Major gaps remain at all levels, which UNESCO is committed to helping to bridge. UNESCO is leading the way in education with two angles of action–first, to promote the use and survival of indigenous cultures, languages, knowledge, traditions and identity, and second, to provide knowledge and skills that enable indigenous peoples to participate fully and equally in the national and international community. We are taking this forward also in the context of the post-2015 development agenda. With our partners, we are advocating for an ambitious and comprehensive education goal that provides due respect to local knowledge systems, including those of indigenous peoples.
 

In the field of culture, UNESCO is working with States to recognize the role of culture as an enabler and a driver of inclusive, sustainable development. For effective and meaningful ownership of all development efforts, we must build on cultural diversity through all public policies and measures.
 

In December 2013, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a third milestone resolution on “Culture and Sustainable Development” (A/C.2/68/L.69). This acknowledges the linkages between culture and the three pillars of sustainable development, as well as with peace and security, encouraging States to give due
consideration to culture in the post-2015 development agenda. Highlighting the link between cultural and biological diversity, the Resolution also underlines the positive contribution of local and indigenous knowledge in tackling environmental challenges.
 

UNESCO’s Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems programme is the spearhead of our action to advance respect for indigenous peoples’ rights to maintain, control, protect and develop their traditional knowledge, and to participate in environmental decision-making.
To this end, we are working to promote the role of indigenous kn owledge in major intergovernmental environmental processes. The 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was important in this respect, concluding that knowledge systems, “including indigenous peoples’ holistic views of community and environment, are a major resource for adapting to climate change”.
 
The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services has adopted recognition of indigenous and local knowledge as one of its operating principles with a Task Force focusing on this issue, for which UNESCO has been designated as the technical support unit.

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous People is a moment to acknowledge the vital contribution of indigenous peoples to innovation and creativity, to sustainable development as well as to cultural diversity. It is also an opportunity for all to mobilise to bridge the gaps that remain to the fulfilment of indigenous peoples’ rights. This is essential today and tomorrow, as we shape the new post-2015 development agenda.

Irina Bokova


Special event at UN Headquarters

Friday, 8 August 2014
3:00 – 6:00pm, ECOSOC Chamber
 " Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples" UNDESADSPD

A special event at UN Headquarters in New York will be held on Friday, 8 August, starting at 3:00pm, featuring the UN Secretary-General, the President of the General Assembly, the Vice-Chairperson of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, a member state delegate, a representative of the Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights, and an indigenous representative. The event will be webcast live at webtv.un.org. See the full programme.PDF document
Representatives of Member States, UN agencies, indigenous peoples’ organizations, non-governmental organizations and the media are invited to attend. Please note that no invitation letters are being issued for this event.
Representative of Member States should confirm their attendance to Mr. Arturo Requesens at requesens@un.org by 6 August at 6pm.

Those who wish to attend the event but do not hold a UN grounds pass must confirm their participation to Berta Bravo at bravo@un.org by 6pm (NY time) of 4 August indicating name, affiliation and contact information.
After successfully registering, participants should pick up their passes at the UN entrance on 1st Avenue at 47th Street, outside the gate, between 2:15pm and 3:00pm on 8 August.


Commemoration of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples
Theme: “Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples”.



Co-organized by the Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Division for Social Policy and Development, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, the Department of Public Information and the NGO Committee on the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples.

 

The World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 2014


The General Assembly, in its resolution 65/198 pdf of 21 December 2010, decided to organize a high-level plenary meeting of the General Assembly, to be known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, in order to share perspectives and best practices on the realization of the rights of indigenous peoples, including pursuing the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
In its resolution 66/296, the General Assembly further decided that the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples would be held on 22 September 2014 and in the afternoon of 23 September 2014 in New York.
The World Conference will be composed of two plenary meetings in the form of an opening and a closing session, three interactive round-table discussions and one interactive panel discussion, with the opening meeting beginning at 9 a.m. on 22 September 2014, followed, in the afternoon, by two round-table discussions taking place simultaneously.
To provide valuable input into the preparatory process for the World Conference, the President of the General Assembly organized on 17 and 18 June 2014 an informal interactive hearing with representatives of indigenous peoples and representatives of entities of the United Nations system, academic institutions, national human rights institutions, parliamentarians, civil society and non-governmental organizations, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the present resolution.
The World Conference will result in a concise, action-oriented outcome document prepared on the basis of inclusive and open informal consultations with Member States and indigenous peoples.





 Resources


RELATED INFORMATION

- See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-people-2014/#sthash.g4Ktu1O6.dpuf

RELATED INFORMATION

- See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-people-2014/#sthash.g4Ktu1O6.dpuf

There's so much more work to be done on behalf of indigenous societies all over the world, and for that we need your help. IDWID 2014 Publication



Indigenous peoples in the Americas continue the long struggle to have their rights respected, to defend their ancestral lands, resources, and ways of life. Indigenous men and women have risen above discrimination, attacks and injustices and stepped forward in defence of their rights, demanding from States concrete measures that protect their lives, livelihoods and territories. On 9 August, UN International Day of Indigenous peoples, Amnesty International would like to add its voice to the millions of Indigenous peoples in the Americas to ensure their rights are respected.

 
° International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)


Our Responsibility to the Seventh Generation - The Healing Circle. 
Read more on http://www.iisd.org/pdf/seventh_gen.pdf

Traditionally, Healing Circles begin in the East and progress clockwise to South, West, and end in the North.

- the East represents the child or the beginning;
- the South represents Youth;
- the West represents Adulthood; and
- the North represents Elders.

Aboriginal world views reflect an interconnectedness between all living forms and consider each of these forms as sacred. Cycles within nature, such as the seasons of spring, summer, fall, and winter, are a main teacher of Indigenous peoples and form the basis of belief systems. Circles, being inherently non-hierarchical and inclusive, represent respect, equality, continuity and interconnectedness. The image of a circle is recognized by many nations and territories, however, each nation and culture may have their own unique meanings associated with the circle.



Our Responsibility to the Seventh Generation - The Healing Circle.

State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2014.

Across the world, minorities and indigenous peoples are disproportionately exposed to hatred. From intimidation and verbal abuse to targeted violence and mass killing, this hatred often reflects and reinforces existing patterns of exclusion.

This year's edition of State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples highlights how hate speech and hate crime, though frequently unreported or unacknowledged, continue to impact on every aspect of their lives.

The volume also documents many of the initiatives being taken to promote positive change and the different ways that governments, civil society and communities can strengthen protections for minorities and indigenous peoples.

IDWID 2014 Publication
International Day of the World's Indigenous People - See more at: http://unpo.org/article/17412#sthash.kNFc7qxR.dpuf



World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples

World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples
The Directory is a unique resource for activists, journalists, academics and decision-makers.
It provides a country-by-country profile of the history and contemporary situation as they relate to minorities and indigenous peoples. The Directory is updated regularly by MRG researchers.
Click here to launch the Directory: http://www.minorityrights.org/directory
- See more at: http://www.minorityrights.org/744/directory/world-directory-of-minorities-and-indigenous-peoples.html#sthash.sR44OUsF.dpuf

 The Directory is a unique resource for activists, journalists, academics and decision-makers.  It provides a country-by-country profile of the history and contemporary situation as they relate to minorities and indigenous peoples. The Directory is updated regularly by MRG researchers. 


World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples