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Thursday, 17 July 2014

Nelson Mandela International Day 2014, 18 July





Last year, the world lost one of its greatest leaders when Nelson Mandela passed away.  We remember his legacy especially on his birthday, the 18th of July.
Nelson Mandela and the United Nations had a strong history together.  Shortly after he was released from prison, he came to our Headquarters. It was a moment of great excitement.
Nelson Mandela’s presence in the General Assembly Hall proved that United Nations resolutions, sanctions and solidarity can win over violence and injustice. His extraordinary compassion after 27 years in prison showed that human rights and equality are stronger than discrimination and hate. On that day in 1990, he said people would always be challenged by the fact that, quote, “it took as long as it has before all of us stood up to say enough is enough.” The room burst into applause.
Apartheid is gone – thanks to Nelson Mandela, countless other individuals and the proud actions of the United Nations. But our planet and its people still face terrible threats -- poverty, discrimination, climate change, conflict and more. Nelson Mandela Day is a call to action. Each of us can celebrate this Day by helping to address real problems in our communities. Together we can give great meaning to our celebration by paving the way for a better future.
Ban Ki-moon


 

Commemorative Events for 2014

New York, UN General Assembly Event


The UN General Assembly will hold a special session meeting to mark Nelson Mandela International Day on 18 July 2014.
This year, in New York, UN staff, joined by the Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, and in partnership with MillionTreesNYC, will volunteer their time on 18 July 2014 and get their hands dirty by pulling weeds, putting down mulch and watering tree beds to help take care of newly planted trees on the streets of Midtown Manhattan and East Harlem. See Take Action to learn more about the activity.
For more information see the UN press release.



Geneva

United Nations Information Service will hold a CinéONU screening at the Palais des Nations, Geneva.
"One Humanity" at 5 p.m. on Friday, 18 July 2014, followed by a debate.
Guests include Mr. Michael Møller, Acting Director-General of the UN Office at Geneva (UNOG); Ms. Navi Pillay, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, and Ambassador Abdul Samad Minty, Permanent Representative of South Africa to the UN in Geneva.



South African President Jacob Zuma, second left, in background with a bust of former South African President Nelson Mandela, center, outside Parliament before giving the State of the Nation address in the city of Cape Town, South Africa, June 17, 2014. +VOA News

For South Africans, a Bittersweet Birthday Celebration for Nelson Mandela - http://www.voanews.com/content/south-africans-bittersweet-birthday-celebration-for-nelson-mandela/1958781.html

Mandela Day Public Service Announcement 2014


Join the ForumNelson Mandela International Day - July 18

 UN: Can you spare 67 minutes to take action on Nelson Mandela Day?

International Criminal Justice Day 2014 , July 17th

International Criminal Justice Day, 17 July.
 Международный день уголовного правосудия, 17 июля.
Día de la Justicia Penal Internacional, 17 de julio.
 Journée de la justice pénale internationale, 17 Juillet.
 يوم العدالة الجنائية الدولية، 17 يوليو



Day of International Criminal Justice - The UN and the ICC: Partners of Shared Values
17 Jul 2014 “Day of International Criminal Justice – The UN and the ICC: Partners of Shared Values” - Marking the Tenth Anniversary of the Relationship Agreement (2004-2014). Organized by the Permanent Mission of Italy to the United Nations. 

 United Nations Secretary-General remarks on International Criminal Justice Day 2014

I thank the Permanent Mission of Italy for hosting this important event.
Today we are marking two milestones.  First, this is of course International Criminal Justice Day.
And second, we celebrate ten years of our Relationship Agreement with the International Criminal Court.
This is a day for all of us to underscore a crucial point: justice matters.
Accountability for serious crimes of international concern is central to our global commitment to peace, security human rights and fundamental freedoms.
So let me begin by once again calling for universal ratification of the Rome Statute.
I also encourage all Member States who are parties to the Rome Statute to do their part to strengthen the International Criminal Court.
Excellencies,
Ladies and Gentlemen,
The drafters of the Rome Statute always envisaged a vital role for the United Nations in support of the Court and its work.

The Relationship Agreement between the United Nations and the Court is founded in a shared belief that the cause of peace can only be served if those responsible for the most serious crimes of international concern are prosecuted and brought to justice.
The world’s commitment to the success of this Court is reflected in the fact that that the Relationship Agreement was approved by the General Assembly without opposition.
The objectives of the Court and the United Nations are clearly aligned.
The Relationship Agreement established a solid foundation for mutual cooperation.
It has served as the basis for a host of supplementary agreements that cover the full range of our common efforts to bring perpetrators of international crimes to justice.
These include detailed arrangements on a number of issues – from the sharing of evidence to the use of modern information technology to facilitating interviews with our officials and experts.
Perhaps most notable are the cooperation agreements with our peacekeeping operations in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Côte d’Ivoire and, soon, Mali.
These agreements allow for the Court to operate more efficiently, in part, because it can rely on the Organization for information and logistical support.
Indeed, one of our child protection officers, Ms. Kristine Peduto, was the first person to testify before the Court in its first trial, that of the warlord, Thomas Lubanga.
Excellencies,
Ladies and Gentlemen,
The Court is the centerpiece of our system of international criminal justice but it is a court of last resort.
We at the United Nations are proud to remain deeply involved in assisting Member States to better address impunity at the national level.
Allow me to commend the Court, and specifically its Prosecutor, for her invaluable work with the States Parties to the Rome Statute.
They have the primary responsibility to investigate and prosecute the serious crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.
I am confident that the relationship between the United Nations and the International Criminal Court will continue to strengthen and grow – through the Office of Legal Affairs and my Legal Counsel, who serve as focal point for cooperation.
The Court will always find in the United Nations a committed partner, a staunch ally and a firm friend.
We look forward to our ongoing close cooperation in the years ahead.
Thank you.
Ban Ki Moon


The Hague, 17 July 2014
CS /1607e,

Together with International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) President Vagn Joensen, President Theodor Meron in his capacity as both ICTY and MICT President sent a letter to International Criminal Court (ICC) President Song today offering their congratulations on the Day of International Criminal Justice, a day that commemorates the adoption of the Rome Statute on 17 July 1998.
In their letter, President Meron and President Joensen said that today’s commemoration offers an opportunity to reflect on the achievements of international criminal justice in the last twenty years, including the establishment of the ICC, ad hoc international courts and the hybrid criminal courts.

“Together these courts—including those over which the two of us preside—have helped to transform the political and legal landscape. Calling senior political and military leaders to account for their acts before courts of law is increasingly the expectation, rather than the exception. This is a heartening development, and one to be both acknowledged and lauded,” the letter stated.

In concluding their letter, they noted that the Day of International Criminal Justice also serves as a reminder that there is still work to be done at both national and international levels “to bring an end to impunity and, more importantly, to prevent the commission of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in the first place.”

 International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia President.




 President Joensen and ICTY President Meron congratulate the ICC on the Day of International Criminal Justice, Jul 17, 2014         
    

Together with International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT) President Theodor Meron, ICTR President Vagn Joensen sent a letter to International Criminal Court (ICC) President Song today offering their congratulations on the Day of International Criminal Justice, a day that commemorates the adoption of the Rome Statute on 17 July 1998.

In their letter, President Meron and President Joensen said that today’s commemoration offers an opportunity to reflect on the achievements of international criminal justice in the last twenty years, including the establishment of the ICC, ad hoc international courts and the hybrid criminal courts.

“Together these courts—including those over which the two of us preside—have helped to transform the political and legal landscape. Calling senior political and military leaders to account for their acts before courts of law is increasingly the expectation, rather than the exception. This is a heartening development, and one to be both acknowledged and lauded,” the letter stated.

In concluding their letter, they noted that the Day of International Criminal Justice also serves as a reminder that there is still work to be done at both national and international levels “to bring an end to impunity and, more importantly, to prevent the commission of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in the first place.”






International Criminal Court (ICC) Messages for the Day of International Criminal Justice Day 2014.

 

 Statement of the ICC President: 17 July, 2014 - A day to unite in building a more just world,


When representatives of 120 States adopted the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), on 17 July 1998, they did so to build a more just world. Conscious that all people are connected, and that mass atrocities committed anywhere threaten the delicate mosaic of modern societies as well as world peace and security, they set up a permanent, international justice system to address crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide by holding individuals accountable either at the national or international level. Through such action, the Rome Statute system aims to help prevent such crimes, to protect all peoples from them, and to uphold what is best, but also most fragile, within us: the shared sense of justice that is a common bond of all humanity. 
Years later, when States Parties to the Rome Statute decided to name the 17th of July as the Day of International Criminal Justice, they invited all of us to commemorate the tremendous efforts of the many international courts and tribunals created in the last two decades while looking forward to what remains to be done. Among these courts is the ICC, the first and only permanent international criminal court with jurisdiction granted by States through a multilateral treaty.
By commemorating 17 July, we recognize past efforts that have fostered reconciliation in societies across the world and have positively affected the lives of hundreds of thousands of victims. We also look to the future, and reaffirm the international community’s commitment to fight against impunity for the most serious crimes, and thereby to stop them from ever being repeated again. 
We are all exposed on a daily basis to news of massacres, crimes and war in multiple regions of the world. Where the ICC has jurisdiction, it endeavours to bring justice to the victims of these crimes. And where it is already involved, the Court’s intervention has galvanised more international attention to communities affected by crimes and the efforts essential to aiding the survivors. However, we are all conscious of the limits of the ICC’s current jurisdiction, which have to be remedied by continued progress towards universal ratification of the Rome Statute.
We recognize that the ICC is only one element in the wider Rome Statute system, the core of which is the responsibility of States themselves to investigate and prosecute the Rome Statute crimes whenever possible. The Statute is built on the principles of universality, complementarity and State cooperation, with the ICC itself as a court of last resort. Like many other parts of the emerging international system, it is still under construction. We continue our efforts and engagement  with the international community so that this new global system can be established with firm foundations, where the law is sovereign and respected, and where  justice for all is recognised as being crucial for peace, stability and development worldwide.
We cannot succeed on our own. All States, organisations and individuals have a role to play in the fight against impunity. Each of us can make a difference. Every year, on 17 July, we review and rededicate our efforts to build a more just world, because we are all connected, and because justice matters to us all.
Audio and video statement, ICC President Judge Sang-Hyun Song:



Each new State Party brings us closer to universal protection from atrocious crimes #17July #Justice Matters
Unite against these 4 atrocious crimes.



Judge Theodor Meron President, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia President, Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals.

Remarks for Celebration of the Day of International Criminal Justice 10 July 2014,
The Hague.

I am delighted to take part in today’s celebration of international criminal justice day.Today, of course, we commemorate the anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute. I was honoured to serve as a member of the US delegation to the Rome Conference back in 1998 , and it is with profound pride that I have witnessed all that the International Criminal Court has achieved in the intervening years As we know from the experiences of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the early years of an international criminal court are fraught with challenges.

 The creation of effective and efficient internal policies and practices,the cultivation of cooperative relationships with affected States, and the development of a coherent body of substantive and procedural jurisprudence based on legal rules and provisions sometimes being applied for the first time—these are but a few of the challenges that can face an international criminal court as it strives to carry out its mandate during the early years of its existence. It is a tribute not just to the International Criminal Court but also to all of the ad hoc international and hybrid criminal courts that,today, calling political and military leaders to account for their acts before courts of law is increasingly the expectation, rather than the exception; that, today, we speak of ensuring accountability for violations of international law not just at a few courtrooms here in The Hague but in national courtrooms the world over; and that, today, we stand, in many ways, in a world transformed from that which existed just two decades ago. But if today is a day to reflect on all that has been achieved since 1998, it is also a day to renew our commitment to the work that remains to be done.

Today is a day to remember that international criminal courts are, and should be, courts of last resort and that it is imperative that States do all they can to ensure the implementation and application of international law in their domestic legal frameworks.

Today is a day to remember that respect for court orders and rulings, even where one may disagree with them, is essential to strengthening respect for the rule of law.

Today is a day for States to renew their commitment to cooperating with and supporting the work of international courts, and for individuals to pause and reflect on why fair and impartial justice is so vital to us all. And today is a day to recall that while international justice is tremendously important, court proceedings alone cannot bring about reconciliation, heal the rifts in a society , or offer closure to victims and survivors. Indeed, such aims, valuable though they may be, fall outside the core mandates entrusted to criminal courts, and where expectations are created to the contrary, it can often seem—erroneously—that international justice is failing. So, today, even as we celebrate all that has been achieved since 1998, we must remember the importance of ensuring a better understanding of international justice.

 We must remember that, without the full commitment of national jurisdictions to international law and to the principles and standards of international law observed by international criminal courts in their proceedings, we will never be able to truly bring an end to impunity and ensure accountability for international crimes. At the same time, we must remember that courts are just part of a panoply of transitional justice measures, including effort s focused on history, memory, community reconciliation, and caring for victims and survivors. And even as we salute international criminal justice today, we must also pay tribute to the many individuals and groups who work so hard every day to bring lasting peace , stability , and respect for the rule of law to their communities in other ways.

Thank you.





 Mr. James Stewart, Deputy Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court Celebration of the Day of International Criminal Justice Brief Remarks.

Your Excellencies,
Honourable Judges,
President Song, Mr Registrar,
Ladies and Gentlemen,

On behalf of the Prosecutor, I am delighted to make a few brief remarks on this important occasion, marking the 16th anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute and the strengthening international criminal justice. To begin, I would like to join with others to thank the organizers, and especially Ambassador Korac, for hosting this event, for this kind invitation, and for their dedication to the International Criminal Court and the cause of international criminal justice. Since its genesis, the ICC has indeed come a long way, from an innovative design on paper to a fully-functioning independent judicial institution.

The Court has faced many challenges along the way, and continues to face them, but the ICC has taken its place in the world as an indispensable legal institution promoting justice, giving a meaningful voice to victims, and helping to prevent mass crimes that threaten the peace, security and wellbeing of humanity. While the Court can point to solid achievements, much work lies ahead. As we improve our own capacity at the Court to do justice and to fulfil the mandate the international community has given us, consistent support of States Parties and the international community is needed to ensure the ICC reaches its full potential. States Parties must strengthen their will and national capacities to exercise their primacy of jurisdiction over mass crimes. Political will and diplomatic endeavour are necessary to ensure that crimes are addressed at the national level in accordance with the standards set by the Rome Statute.

When it becomes necessary for the Court to exercise its jurisdiction, however, the full and timely cooperation from States Parties remains necessary if the Court is to do justice effectively. As the Office charged with investigating and prosecuting the most heinous international crimes, we carry great responsibility, first and foremost toward the victims and communities affected by atrocities, but also to the international community as a whole. Cooperation is essential to enable us to discharge these responsibilities. Generally speaking, our requests for cooperation receive positive responses from both States Parties and States not party to the Rome Statute. There are exceptions and challenges, of course, but these are to be expected, since “push-back” in some quarters was inevitable as we implemented our mandate under the Rome Statute. The support and cooperation we receive, nonetheless, strengthens us and allows us to conduct our work in order to bring well prepared cases, built on solid foundations, before the Chambers.

The on-going implementation of the Office’s Strategic Plan is only reinforcing our ability to enhance the quality of our operations and to ensure success. The road to the achievement of justice in a complex, often violent, world is not without pitfalls. It can be a rocky road. But we relish the journey and do not fear the challenges we will meet along the way. Indeed, what other choice have we? The Court was created to advance the international rule of law and to deter the commission of mass crimes that shock the conscience of humanity and inflict great suffering. We must fulfil its promise.

The ICC represents the triumph of hope for a better, more just and peaceful world over a human history marred by mass atrocities and unchecked impunity. In its respect for due process, in its mandate to investigate and prosecute the perpetrators of mass crimes, in its striving to give voice to victims and bring them a measure of justice, the ICC represents the best hope of the international community to realise the ideals of international criminal justice.

As we are gathered here to commemorate International Criminal Justice Day, may I conclude by borrowing from a very different context the words of the late Martin Luther King Jr. in a speech he delivered in 1968, only months before his assassination. He stated: "It may be true that the law cannot change the heart but it can restrain the heartless. It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me, but it can restrain him from lynching me; and I think that is pretty important also. And so while the law may not change the hearts of men, it does change the habits of men if vigorously enforced, and through changes in habits, pretty soon attitudinal changes will take place and even the heart may be changed in the process. […]

With this faith [in the power of the law] we will be able to transform the jangling discords of all the nations in the world, into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood and speed up the day when all over the world justice will roll down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.” The ICC offers us the opportunity to advance the cause of justice the world over.

Together we can ensure that justice – will always – matter. Thank you for your attention.

"The most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole must not go unpunished." The Rome Statute

  Resources :

Thursday, 10 July 2014

World Population Day 2014, July 11.







As the world population edged to 7 billion people in 2011 (up from 2.5 billion in 1950), it has had profound implications for development. A world of 7 billion is both a challenge and an opportunity with implications on sustainability, urbanization, access to health services and youth empowerment.
In 1989, in its decision 89/46, the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme recommended that, in order to focus attention on the urgency and importance of population issues in the context of overall development plans and programmes and the need to find solutions for these issues, 11 July should be observed by the international community as World Population Day.

Today’s 1.8 billion young people are shaping social and economic realities, challenging norms and values, and building the foundation of the world’s future. Yet too many young people continue to grapple with poverty, inequality and human rights violations that prevent them from reaching their personal and collective potential.
On 2014 World Population Day, we call for investments in support of the largest-ever generation of youth.





The world today has its largest generation of youth in history – 1.8 billion young people, mostly in developing countries – with enormous potential to help tackle the major challenges facing humanity. But too many are denied their rightful opportunities to get a quality education, find decent work, and participate in the political life of their societies. World Population Day is an opportunity to renew our commitment to help young people unleash progress across society.
Action is urgently needed. Too many young people lack resources they need to lift themselves out of poverty. I am particularly concerned about adolescent girls who may face discrimination, sexual violence, early marriage and unwanted pregnancies. And even among those young people fortunate enough to receive university degrees, many find themselves without employment or stuck in low-wage, dead-end jobs.
The solution lies in investments in health, education, training and employment for young people as they undergo the critical transition to adulthood. This will improve prospects for their lives and our common future.
Young people themselves are speaking out.  Earlier this year, more than 1,000 youth organizations endorsed a Global Youth Call, welcomed by 40 countries, which recommends youth-focused goals and targets in the post-2015 development vision.
Next year marks the deadline for reaching the Millennium Development Goals, shaping the successor agenda, and adopting a meaningful legal agreement on climate change. Youth have a major role in all these processes. The year 2015 also marks the 20th anniversary of the World Programme of Action on Youth. Its practical guidelines for national action and international support remain relevant today. In particular, to fully carry out this Programme of Action, governments must respect the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all youth and respond effectively to any violations.

On this World Population Day, I call on all with influence to prioritize youth in development plans, strengthen partnerships with youth-led organizations, and involve young people in all decisions that affect them. By empowering today’s youth, we will lay the groundwork for a more sustainable future for generations to come.

Ban Ki-moon

PRB World Population

United Nations Under-Secretary-General and UNFPA Executive Director, Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, on World Population Day 2014


 Today’s 1.8 billion young people are a powerful force, individually and collectively. They are shaping social and economic realities, challenging norms and values and building the foundation of the world’s future.

 Governments and the international community are increasingly conscious of the importance of providing resources and opportunities for all young people to reach their full potential as individuals and citizens. They recognize that investing in young people and enabling them to exercise their human rights not only benefits young people themselves, but can also help their countries reap a demographic dividend.

 We know that healthy, educated, productive and fully engaged young people can help break the cycle of intergenerational poverty and are more resilient in the face of individual and societal challenges. As skilled and informed citizens, they can contribute more fully to their communities and nations.

 For millions of young people around the world, puberty – the biological onset of adolescence – brings not only changes to their bodies, but also new vulnerabilities to human rights abuses, particularly in the areas of sexuality, marriage and childbearing. Millions of girls are coerced into unwanted sex or marriage, increasing the risks of unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, as well as death or disability due to childbirth.

 This is why young people, especially adolescent girls, are at the heart of our work at UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund. Working with a multitude of partners, in particular young people themselves, UNFPA is advocating policies and programmes that invest in adolescents and youth and foster a positive environment for them; promoting their access to comprehensive sexuality education as well as quality sexual and reproductive health services, including family planning; and facilitating their leadership and participation. We are doing this with an emphasis on reaching the poorest, most marginalized and underserved adolescent girls.

 Through this multipronged effort, we and our partners are seeing how critical early investments in sexual and reproductive health can enhance the lives of young people and the welfare of their societies.

A sustainable future depends on having resilient populations, which cannot be achieved without investments in young people. They not only form a large proportion of the world’s population and deserve their fair share as a matter of equity, but are also in a critical stage of their lifecycle that will determine their future – and thus those of their families, communities, and societies. On this World Population Day, I commit UNFPA’s full support to all efforts to promote young people’s aspirations and to place young people at the very heart of national and global development efforts.


Related resources

 Investing in youth pays dividends, evidence from Sri Lanka shows
 World Population Day 2014
2013 World Population Data sheet. Population Reference Bureau.
 Press conference on the latest figures from the World Urbanization Prospects: the 2014 Revision
 World Health Organization (WHO) Non-Communicable Disease Country Profiles 2014.



Tuesday, 1 July 2014

20th United Nations International Day of Cooperatives, July 5

Международный день кооперативов, 5 июля.
Día Internacional de las Cooperativas,5 de julio.


This year’s International Day of Cooperatives falls at a critical time. The United Nations is working to lay the groundwork for success on three major fronts in 2015: reaching the Millennium Development Goals; achieving a meaningful new climate agreement; and adopting a long-range agenda for inclusive sustainable development.
Cooperative enterprises can help further these objectives. They are helping communities in both developed and developing countries to generate energy, manage water supplies and provide other basic services. Cooperatives are particularly important to agriculture, food security and rural development. In the finance sector, cooperatives serve more than 857 million people, including tens of millions who live in poverty.
As member-owned, member-run and member-serving businesses, cooperatives can put social justice and equity at the heart of economic progress while helping to ensure that the production and provision of goods and services matches the needs and aspirations of communities.
On this International Day of Cooperatives, let us commit to making even greater use of these arrangements to empower people and usher in a more sustainable future.

Ban Ki-moon

The global E-magazine on cooperatives in industry and services

This year, International Co-operative Day, to be celebrated on 5 July, will have the theme of "Co-operative enterprises achieve sustainable development for all.” Concern for the community is one of the co-operative movement’s founding values and, as such, the need to sustainably safeguard favourable living conditions for communities underpins all co-operatives’ operations and vision.

Tema de 2014: Las empresas cooperativas logran el desarrollo sostenible para todos.
Thème pour 2014: Les entreprises coopératives aboutissent au développement durable pour tous.
Тема для 2014: Кооперативные предприятия достижения устойчивого развития для всех.
 主題2014年合作經營企業實現可持續發展一切
 موضوع لعام 2014: الشركات التعاونية تحقيق التنمية المستدامة للجميع.
 2014のテーマ協同組合企業はすべてのために持続的な発展を実現しています





Since that date the global community celebrates United Nations International Day of Cooperatives and ICA's International Cooperative Day on the first Saturday of July. The United Nations Secretary-General issues a message on the occasion of the day as does the International Co-operative Alliance as well as other COPAC members. Celebrations of the Day are held at the international, national and local levels around the world.


The Cooperative Movement :

The significance of cooperatives have been acknowledged as associations and enterprises through which citizens can effectively improve their lives while contributing to the economic, social, cultural and political advancement of their community and nation. The cooperative movement has been also recognized as a distinct and major stakeholder in both national and international affairs.

The cooperative movement is highly democratic, locally autonomous but internationally integrated, and a form of organization of associations and enterprises whereby citizens themselves rely on self-help and their own responsibility to meet goals that include not only economic but social and environmental objectives, such as overcoming poverty, securing productive employment and encouraging social integration.
In 1992, following a concerted lobbying effort by the cooperative movements in membership of the International Co- operative Alliance (ICA) and members of the Committee for the Promotion and Advancement of Cooperatives (COPAC), the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed the International Day of Cooperatives by the UN by resolution 47/90 of 16 December 1992.

The resolution states:
"... The General Assembly, ... Proclaims the first Saturday of July 1995 to be the International Day of Cooperatives, marking the centenary of the establishment of the International Cooperative Alliance, and decides to consider the possibility of observing an International Day of Cooperatives in future years; ..."
The date of the celebration of the International Day was chosen to coincide with the already existing International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) International Cooperative Day with has been celebrated since 1923.
In 1994, the United Nations General Assembly adopted another resolution 49/155 of 23 December 1994 on cooperatives which not only called on governments and international agencies to:
"consider fully the potential of cooperatives for contributing to the solution of economic, social and environmental problems in formulating national development strategies; and consider reviewing legal and administrative constraints on the activities of cooperatives with a view to eliminating those constraints that are not applied to other businesses and enterprises",
but also invited:
"...governments, relevant international organizations, specialized agencies and national and international cooperative organizations to observe annually the International Day of Cooperatives on the first Saturday of July starting from 1995, as proclaimed by the General Assembly in its resolution 47/90".




Cooperative enterprises achieve sustainable development for all. Panel Discussion, International Day of Cooperative 2014

 Cooperative enterprises put social justice and equity at the heart of economic progress. As member-owned, member-run and member-serving businesses, cooperatives empower people to collectively realize their economic aspirations, while strengthening their social and human capital and developing their communities.

To celebrate the International Day of Cooperatives this year, UNDESA-DSPD in partnership with the Committee for the Promotion and Advancement of Cooperatives (COPAC) will organize a panel discussion on “Cooperative enterprises achieve sustainable development for all” on 10 July 2014 from 10am to 1pm in conference room 3 (CB) at UN Headquarters, New York.

The 2014 commemoration of the International Day of Cooperatives will highlight the principles, values and operational realities of cooperatives that make them unique instruments for achieving sustainable development and showcase the importance of the business model to realizing people-centred, inclusive development, post-2015.





Newsletters : 

This issue of the COOP News includes articles on various events, projects, trainings and meetings related to the work of the ILO's COOP Unit between January and March, 2014.


Publications : 

Providing clean energy and energy access through cooperatives
Providing clean energy and energy access through cooperatives - ILO


This publication is a collection of case studies on cooperatives in energy production, distribution and consumption as a contribution to the on-going search for ways in which the goal of sustainable Energy for All can be turned into a reality.


Cooperatives and Sustainability - An investigation into the relationship.

Cooperatives and Sustainability - An investigation into the relationship.
 


Last month, the International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) held their annual conference in Cape Town. One the presentations at this conference included reporting on the results of a partnership project, between Community Research Connections and the Sustainability Solutions Group, that investigated the relationship between the cooperative model and sustainable development. This research employed a unique methodology to compare key concepts distilled from seminal literature on sustainability to (firstly) the cooperatives principles and (secondly) websites and annual reports from various cooperatives around the world. As this was a global scan, the study was limited in the manner that it did not visit the cooperatives on-the-ground and thus could not validate whether cooperatives are actually acting in a sustainable manner; however, this work served as an initial step to see if cooperative model inherently leads to thinking and speaking about sustainability.
Some of the main observations from the research include:
  1. Co-operatives are involved in the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainability.
  2. The co-operative principles are more closely aligned with the social dimensions of sustainability.
  3. Similarly, co-operatives websites and annual reports (overall) most strongly related to social aspects of sustainability.
  4. In communicating their efforts on sustainability, co-operatives understate their efforts on Principles 1, 2 and 3.
  5. A co-operative is sustainable when it is an economically viable business that fully implements the seven co-operative principles, and maintains or regenerates the ecosystem in which they are embedded.
  6. Co-operative associations lag behind co-operatives in advancing a comprehensive sustainability agenda.
  7. Of the cooperative principles, concepts related to principle 5 (education, training, knowledge sharing), principle 6 (cooperation among cooperatives), and principle 7 (sustainable community development) were strongly communicated.
  8. Cooperatives websites highlighted sustainability concepts, whereas in the annual reports, sustainability concepts were discussed in context with items (e.g., items relating business operations).
The report can be downloaded from Sustainability Solutions Group's website here, and the presentation on the research can be downloaded from here.

Cooperatives and the Sustainable Development Goals - A contribution to the Post-2015 Development Debate. A ploicy Brief


Cooperatives and the Sustainable Development Goals - A contribution to the Post-2015 Development Debate. A ploicy Brief



 This brief summarizes the main findings of a forthcoming report of the same title, by Frederick O. Wanyama of Maseno University in Kenya, prepared as part of ILO’s contribution to the initiative on the contribution of cooperatives to sustainable development.






Cooperative movement engagement in sustainable development and the post-2015 process: Survey findings

In order to bring cooperative voices into the discussion around the post-2015 development agenda, the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the International Co-operative Alliance (ICA) have launched an initiative on the contribution of cooperatives to sustainable development. This brief reports on the results of an online survey that investigated the current and potential contributions of cooperatives to sustainable development.



"The term 'cooperative' means an autonomous association of persons united voluntarily to meet their common economic, social and cultural needs and aspirations through a jointly owned and democratically controlled enterprise."


 Forum :International Day of Cooperative, July 5th


U.S. Overseas Cooperative Development Council (OCDC) - Sustainable development: It’s what OCDC does 

 OCDC brings together organizations committed to building a more prosperous world through cooperatives. Its mission is to champion, advocate and promote effective international cooperative development. OCDC members are global leaders in cooperative development in Africa, Latin America and Asia. With projects in over 70 counties, OCDC members implement the largest port folio of cooperative development programs in the world. Members are: ACDI/VOCA, Cooperative Resources International, Global Communities, HealthPartners, Land O'Lakes International Development, NCBA CLUSA  , National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and the World Council of Credit Unions


This year, International Co-operative Day, to be celebrated on 5 July, will have the theme of “Co-operative enterprises achieve sustainable development for all.” Read message here
Cette année, la Journée internationale des coopératives, qui sera célébrée le 5 juillet, aura pour thème : « les entreprises coopératives aboutissent au développement durable pour tous ». Lire message ici
El lema de esta edición del Día Internacional de las Cooperativas, que se celebrará el 5 de julio, será “Las empresas cooperativas logran el desarrollo sostenible para todos”. Leer noticia aquí


GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS



The Global Competitiveness Report 2013-2014 assesses the competitiveness landscape of 148 economies, providing insight into the drivers of their productivity and prosperity. The Report series remains the most comprehensive assessment of national competitiveness worldwide.


 
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Thursday, 26 June 2014

International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, June 26.

International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, 26 June.
Día Internacional de las Naciones Unidas en Apoyo de las Víctimas de la Tortura, 26 de junio.
Международный день в поддержку жертв пыток, 26 июня.
Journée internationale pour le soutien aux victimes de la torture, 26 juin.
支持酷刑受害者国际日,6月26.
 اليوم الدولي لمساندة ضحايا التعذيب







Secretary-General's Message on the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, 26 June 2014.

Every day, mental and physical torture and ill-treatment are intentionally inflicted on women, men, children in all regions of the world at the instigation of public officials – the very people whose job it is to enforce the rule of law, protect human rights and keep people safe.

The prohibition of torture is absolute.  The Convention against Torture states unequivocally that the use of torture is illegal under any circumstances, including armed conflict, the fight against terrorism, political instability or other emergency conditions.  All 155 States that have ratified this treaty have committed to fight impunity by thoroughly investigating and prosecuting violations and bringing perpetrators, no matter their level of office, to justice. They have also accepted the obligation to provide redress to the victims and their families.

Regrettably, the right of victims of torture to effective remedies, including rehabilitation, is yet to become a reality, in particular in the context of armed conflicts and large-scale humanitarian crisis.

The Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture is a practical tool of the United Nations to extend prompt assistance to victims of torture and their families.  Today, along the borders with Syria, the Fund is supporting projects providing vital services to victims of torture fleeing violence and persecution.  Essential psycho-social assistance is being delivered to help victims of all age groups recover and regain their dignity.  I thank the States and private donors that are supporting the Fund's efforts, and urge even more to join in this work.

I urge States that have not yet done so to ratify the Convention against Torture, which this year marks 30 years since its adoption. As we honour the victims on this International Day, let us pledge to strengthen our efforts to eradicate this heinous practice.

Ban Ki-moon

Ratification of the Convention against Torture and other cruel, Inhuman or Degrating treatment or Punishment, January 2013.

Status of ratification of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment



Join the forum : International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, June 26th.





United Nations Voluntary Fund For Victims of Torture, List of grantees 2014, 38th session of the Board of Trustee

The UN Torture Fund does not receive contributions from the UN Regular Budget or the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.
Voluntary contributions are made mainly by Member States of the United Nations. Private foundations and individuals contribute as well currently, to a symbolic extent (less than 1%).
In line with UN Rules and Regulations Programme support costs, i.e. overheads, are kept at a minimum, and do not exceed 13% on a yearly basis. Such costs include staffing and equipment.
In 2010, the UN Torture Fund received approximately US$9.4 million in contributions from 25 donors (including 23 Member States) a decrease of 13.8 per cent compared to 2009, when 31 donors supported its activities.
In 2011 the UN Torture Fund faced an additional shortfall to continue to meet requests from grantees at the 2010 level, as contributions were limited to US$7.9 million, which compelled the Board to decide on strategic cuts to grantees.
For 2012, additional cuts had to be applied to all projects. Namely, a decrease of 40 per cent applied to grants awarded to ongoing projects located in Western European and Others Group (WEOG) countries, while the level of support to projects located in other regions was reduced by 30 per cent. With a view to mitigating the effects of the cuts on small-grass roots organizations, in particular those located in remote regions where access to alternative funding is difficult, no strategic cut was applied to grants of US$20,000 or below.
For 2013, at its thirty-sixth session the Board was compelled to maintain the strategic cuts to grants introduced in 2012 in addition to those already introduced for the 2011 cycle, which had decreased by 40 per cent grants awarded to projects located in States of the group of Western European and
other States and by 30 per cent grants awarded to projects located in other regions.
For 2014, due to a further decrease in contributions received, the Board was compelled to introduce measures to absorb the funding shortage. Cuts were introduced in a proportional manner, using among others criteria such as the grantee’s dependency to the Fund and the longevity of support from the Fund to the grantee.
It is to be noted that, as a rule, the maximum support to all grantees was capped at US$80,000 instead of the usual US$200,000. In addition, funding for training and seminars for professionals assisting victims was capped at US$5,000, instead of the usual US$30,000. As it was already the case in 2011, support for direct assistance to new grantees was capped at a maximum of US$20,000 instead of the usual US$50,000.
The need for states to continue to contribute to this crucial humanitarian Fund was recalled by the marking the International day in Support of Victims of Torture.

The historical evolution of contributions to the UN Torture Fund since its creation is charted below.

Wednesday, 25 June 2014

International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking 2014 , 26 June,

International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, 26 June,
Theme 2014 : « A message of hope: Drug use disorders are preventable and treatable.»

Día Internacional de la Lucha contra el Uso Indebido y el Tráfico Ilícito de Drogas,26 de junio,
Tema de 2014: « Un mensaje de esperanza: Los trastornos por uso de drogas son prevenibles y tratables.»

Journée internationale contre l'abus et le trafic de drogues, 26 juin,
Thème 2014 - « Un message d'espoir : Oui c'est possible de prévenir et de traiter les troubles liés à l'usage des drogues. »

Международный день борьбы со злоупотреблением наркотическими средствами и их незаконным оборотом, 26 июня,

禁止药物滥用和非法贩运国际日, 6月26日,
« 2014年主题: “希望的信息——药物使用障碍是可以预防和治疗的”»

الصفحة الرئيسية - اليوم الدولي لمكافحة إساءة استعمال المخدرات والاتجار غير المشروع بها
ع عام 2014: رسالة أمل — يمكن الوقاية من الإضطرابات الناجمة عن تعاطي المخدرات وعلاجه









Secretary-General's Message on International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, 26 June 2014.


Drug abuse and illicit trafficking have calamitous consequences for the world’s efforts to deliver greater prosperity and equality for all.  There are up to 200,000 preventable deaths each year from overdoses.  Illicit drugs spawn criminal violence and weaken a state’s essential institutions.

Countries emerging from conflict or escaping economic decline can be overwhelmed when illicit drugs pour across their borders.  The United Nations, working across peacekeeping, law enforcement, health, human rights and other related areas, is strongly committed to helping them repel illicit drugs and prevent spill-over from becoming takeover.

On the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, I urge the international community to strengthen its efforts to confront illicit drugs as an integral element in building a safe and sustainable future.

Ban Ki-Moon



14 Jul 2014 - UN Secretary-General's video message at the High Level Panel Discussion on “Sustainable Development and the World Drug Problem: Challenges and Opportunities".
 






Statement from Mr Yury Fedotov, Executive Director of UNODC on International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, 26 June 2014.

Illicit drugs threaten people's health and welfare. Up to 200,000 people die every year due to illicit drugs; but drugs do not just affect the user, they cause tremendous hardship and misery to families and loved ones.

Drug use disorders undermine close relationships, damage home lives, including those of children, and can ruin education and employment opportunities. Their impact is felt in communities, criminal justice systems and across society.

UNODC's theme for this year's International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking offers a message of hope: Drug use disorders are preventable and treatable.

Those who suffer from drug use disorders can be supported through evidence-based treatment, and many of those who die, do so from overdoses that are preventable. Children and young people must also be educated on the dangers of illicit drugs.

My message today has three components.

    First. Sustained success against illicit drugs requires a balanced, cooperative, and integrated approach founded on the conventions that addresses both supply and demand reduction;
    Second. A balanced approach includes comprehensive measures focused on prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and social protection and cohesion; and
    Third. Science holds the key. UNODC is bridging the gap between science and practice by fostering a dialogue between policy makers and the scientific community.

Together these elements form part of UNODC's global mission to promote and support access to drug dependence treatment and care services and HIV prevention, for people who use drugs, in line with human rights standards.

On the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, it is important to remember that drug use disorders are preventable and treatable. That, where there is help, there is also hope.


Events Organized for Word Drug Day 2014

The World Drug Report

World Drug Report 2014


23 June 2014 - The World Drug Report 2014 will be presented to Member States on 26 June by UNODC's Executive Director, Yury Fedotov, in Vienna, during the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking. The report will be launched during a Special Event of the fifty-seventh session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

The World Drug Report provides an annual overview of the major developments in drug markets for the various drug categories, ranging from production to trafficking, including development of new routes and modalities, as well as consumption. A section of the World Drug Report 2014 provides a global overview of the latest developments with respect to opiates, cocaine, cannabis and amphetamines (including "ecstasy") and the health impact of drug use. Another section addresses the control of precursor chemicals used in the manufacture of illicit drugs.

Follow @UNODC on Twitter and use #WDR2014 or #WorldDrugReport for updates.


Promotional Material :


UNODC leads the global campaign to raise awareness about the major challenge that illicit drugs represent to society as whole, and especially to the young. The campaign encourage young people to put their health first and not to take drugs.

 Brochure "Get the Facts"



ForumWorld Drug Day, June 26th.

Cannabis  - All form of cannabis are usually smoked, Cannabis resin and oil can also be swallowed or brewed in tea.

Cocaine  - It is usually sniffed,snorted or injected, whereas crack is smoked.
Heroine - It is usually injected but can also be snorted, smoked or inhaled.
LSD - D-Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, It is usually swallowed.
Ecstasy - It is usually swallowed, but can also be snorted and inhaled.







Methamphetamine - Crak meth, Ice, Crystal meth, Tik, Shabu, Yaba,  It can be swallowed, sniffed; snorted, smoked or injected.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) is leading the global campaign to raise awareness about the major challenge that illicit drugs represent to society as a whole, and especially to the young. The goal of the campaign is to mobilize support and inspire people to act against drug use.
UNODC encourages as many awareness-raising activities as possible around the globe and invites individuals, non-profit organizations, the private sector and Member States to get involved by:
  • Organizing outreach or institutional events to mark 26 June, the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking
  • Spreading the word about the campaign through your own networks and contacts
  • Using the campaign slogan and logo in promotional products, websites and social media
  • Donating funds to your local NGO in support to drug prevention and treatment efforts, or making in-kind contributions to the campaign and related events