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Saturday, 29 August 2015

International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances 2015, August 30th





Victims of enforced disappearances are deprived of their liberty, kept in secret detention and seldom released. Often their fate remains unknown; they are frequently tortured and in constant fear of being killed. Even if they are eventually set free, the physical and psychological scars stay with them for the rest of their lives. The victims’ families and loved ones also suffer immense anguish.
Far from being a practice employed only in the past by military dictatorships, enforced disappearance continues to be used by some States. In the past year alone, the Committee on Enforced Disappearances and the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearance -- the two United Nations mechanisms on enforced disappearance, composed of independent experts -- received 246 requests by family members across the world to take urgent action. This figure is just a fraction of the thousands of cases that are never reported either because of security conditions or because of a lack of knowledge of the existence of international mechanisms that can help.
In recent years there has also been an alarming number of acts by non-state actors, including armed extremist and terrorist groups, that are tantamount to enforced disappearances and that are also gross abuses of human rights.
The prohibition of enforced disappearance is absolute. The International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance affirms unequivocally that the use of enforced disappearance is illegal under any circumstances, including war, internal political instability or any other public emergency.
The Convention entered into force in 2010, has been signed by 93 States and ratified by 50, and provides a sound foundation for fighting impunity, protecting disappeared persons and their families and strengthening the guarantees provided by the rule of law -- including investigation, prosecution, justice and reparation.
On this international day, I urge all Member States to ratify or accede to the Convention without delay, and I call on the States parties to the Convention to implement it. It is time for an end to all enforced disappearances.
Ban Ki-moon

Amid Growing Use of Enforced Disappearances by Non-State Actors, Secretary-General Urges Prompt Action in Message on International Day Commemorating Victims.


 “Time is of the essence” – UN experts call for global rules for the immediate search of the disappeared International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances - Sunday 30 August 2015

GENEVA (28 August 2015) –Two United Nations expert groups on enforced disappearances call on States to establish and activate protocols for the immediate search of disappeared persons across the world.

Speaking ahead of the International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances, on Sunday 30 August, the Committee on Enforced Disappearances and the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances urge Governments to activate all means of search of disappeared persons in a systematic way, including through the establishment of protocols.

“Over the last year, we have been working on 246 recent cases of enforced disappearances perpetrated all over the world - a clear indication that this heinous practice is still used in a number of countries. These cases are nevertheless only the tip of the iceberg of thousands of cases which are never reported either because of fear of reprisals or because the security conditions do not allow doing so.

The lack of resources and the insufficient awareness of existing international mechanisms are other reasons why many cases of enforced disappearances are never reported to the United Nations.

Following the activation of the urgent actions procedures by the Working Group and the Committee on Enforced Disappearances over the last year, 13 disappeared persons were found alive, in detention, and sadly two were found dead.

These procedures can make a difference for the relatives in despair:

‘I would like to inform you that due to your constant intervention and monitoring of the situation, XX was released by his abductors. Words cannot express how grateful we are to the Working Group and I request you to personally convey my indebtedness to every member of the group.’

‘Thanks for reading my messages and for taking them into account. I finally have the impression that someone is listening to me and paying attention to the case of my son,’ wrote the mother of a disappeared person.

‘I would like to inform you hereby that because of the impact of strong support and concern shown by your office, xx and xx were safely released.’

‘The letter of the Committee was received two weeks ago. A few days later, [the authorities] came to visit us to inform about the investigation and invited us to take part to it. It is the first time after so many months that we have the impression that things are moving again,’ wrote jointly the mothers of two disappeared persons.

The experience and use of the tool of urgent actions by the Committee and the Working Group show that in the case of enforced disappearance time is of the essence. The hours and days that follow a disappearance are crucial to find the disappeared person alive. The actions taken in the immediate aftermath of a disappearance cannot be left to hazards but have to be systematized in protocols that permit the immediate activation of all means at disposal for the search of the disappeared.

These protocols for the search of the disappeared need to be established in all States - irrespective of the number of enforced disappearances - and have to presume, at least initially, that the disappeared person must be searched alive.

We call upon governments to take action as soon as a case of disappearance is reported to the authorities and all necessary measures to seek and find the disappeared person and to avoid irreparable harm.

We equally urge governments to guarantee the full protection from all forms of reprisals of those who report cases of enforces disappearances, the authors of the urgent actions requests, the witnesses, the relatives of the disappeared persons, their defence counsels, and all persons taking part in the related investigations.

We also encourage all those whose beloved ones have disappeared, as well as those acting on their behalf, to make use of the tool provided by the urgent action procedures* of the Working Group and of the Committee on Enforced Disappearances.”



Amnistía Internacional La desaparición de más de 22 mil personas en México, las ejecuciones extrajudiciales en Tlatlaya, los feminicidos en Chihuahua y las decenas de miles de secuestros de personas migrantes en su paso por el país reflejan el grave contexto de violaciones a los derechos humanos en México que ha habitado durante décadas bajo una larga sombra de impunidad. 

Es momento de poner fin al sufrimiento de las familias por la desaparición de uno o más de sus integrantes, que nuestros familiares desaparezcan #NoEsNormal

Firma la petición y ayúdanos a evitar que estos atroces crímenes se olviden y queden impunes.

International Day against Nuclear Tests 2015, August 29th

 禁止核试验国际日, 8月29日.
 Международный день действий против ядерных испытаний, 29 августа.
 International Day Against Nuclear Tests, 29 August.
 Día Internacional contra los Ensayos Nucleares‬, ‪29 de Agosto‬.
 Journée internationale contre les essais nucléaires, 29 Août.
اختبارات اليوم الدولي لمكافحة النووية , 29 آب/أغسطس




United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon Message on the International Day Against Nuclear Tests 2015.
This year marks the 70th anniversary of the dawn of the nuclear age. Seven decades ago, the Trinity Test unleashed the power of more than 20,000 tons of TNT and precipitated over 2,000 additional nuclear tests.
Pristine environments and populated communities in Central Asia, North Africa, North America and the South Pacific were hit. Many have never recovered from the resulting environmental, health and economic damage.
Poisoned groundwater, cancer, leukaemia, radioactive fallout – these are among the poisonous legacies of nuclear testing.
The best way to honour the victims of past tests is to prevent any in the future.
The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty is essential for the elimination of nuclear weapons. It is a legally-binding, verifiable means by which to constrain the quantitative and qualitative development of nuclear weapons.
Nearly two decades after the CTBT was negotiated, the time has long past
for its entry-into-force.
I welcome the voluntary moratoria on testing imposed by nuclear-armed States. At the same time, I stress that these cannot substitute for a legally-binding Treaty.
On this International Day, I repeat my longstanding call on all remaining States to sign and ratify the Treaty – especially the eight necessary for its entry-into-force – as a critical step on the road to a nuclear-weapon-free world.

Ban Ki-moon



This year marks the 70th anniversary of the first nuclear weapon test, carried out in New Mexico in July 1945. In the months following that test, the General Assembly adopted its first resolution calling for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction. Furthermore, in 2009, the General Assembly adopted resolution 64/35, designating 29 August as the International Day against Nuclear Tests.
This year’s commemoration of the International Day against Nuclear Tests presents an opportunity to raise awareness and educate the public about this critical issue. Education can play a key role in building mutual understanding, promoting peace, and advocating for disarmament. We should make use of this occasion to engage with civil society, the media and academia, to work together towards a world free of nuclear weapons.
Despite the grave impacts of nuclear weapons testing on human lives, the environment, and international peace and security; the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) has still not entered into force. During its current session, the United Nations General Assembly has reiterated its firm commitment to the Treaty. I would like to use this occasion to stress the vital importance and urgency of its signature and ratification, without delay, in order to realize the CTBT’s early entry into force.
The recently held 2015 Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) has highlighted the stark reality of the increasing divisions between the States parties over the future of nuclear disarmament. It is now time to bridge the gap and work with more resolute political will to ensure that the NPT continues to remain the cornerstone of global security. 
I applaud the efforts of the Government of Kazakhstan, not only for initiating the International Day against Nuclear Tests, but also for its continuing leadership in efforts to end nuclear weapons testing and to promote a world free of nuclear weapons.
I also commend the recent announcement of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on Iran’s nuclear programme, reached in Vienna between the E3 + 3 and Iran as an important step forward on this critical issue. I hope this agreement will benefit the non-proliferation regime and will lead to greater mutual understanding and cooperation on the many serious security challenges in the Middle East and beyond. 
As President of the General Assembly, I will convene an informal meeting of the plenary of the General Assembly to mark this important international day on 10 September 2015 under the overall theme “Towards Zero: Resolving the Contradictions”.     
Sam Kahamba Kutesa




Message by the Executive Secretary of the Comprehensive Nuclear-­‐Test-­‐Ban Treaty Organization Lassina Zerbo for  the International Day Against Nuclear Tests 2015.

Banning nuclear weapons testing – an unfinished business In Japan earlier this month, I had the privilege to meet Makoto Takahara, who was 17 when the nuclear bomb detonated over his home city Hiroshima. Hearing his first-­‐hand account of the horrors he witnessed then once again put into sharp focus for me the threat posed by nuclear weapons. I am proud to support the Hibakusha, as the survivors are known, in calling on the world: No more Hiroshima; no more Nagasaki. The more than 2,000 nuclear tests conducted during the Cold War paved the way for the development of weapons that dwarf the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs in explosive power. Populations downwind from the test sites paid with their health and often their lives. One of the most affected areas was Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan.

August 29 marks the day of the first nuclear test at Semipalatinsk, as well as the site’s closure in 1991 by the newly independent Kazakhstan. At the country’s initiative, the date has been commemorated since 2010 as the International Day against Nuclear Tests. August 29 serves as reminder that banning nuclear testing remains unfinished business. The Comprehensive Nuclear-­‐Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), in spite of enjoying near-­‐universal support, has yet to become legally binding due to its exceptionally demanding entry into force clause, which prescribes that all 44 countries listed in the Treaty as nuclear technology holders must ratify. Of these, eight still remain: China, Egypt, India, Iran, Israel, North Korea, Pakistan, and the United States.

The Treaty has nonetheless gone a long way in limiting and stigmatizing nuclear testing, largely due to a robust verification regime which is nearly fully operational. Only a handful of nuclear tests have been conducted since the Treaty was adopted in 1996 and only one country, North Korea, has tested in this century.

Entry into force of the Treaty will require political leadership and determination at all levels, but once the ban on all nuclear testing is a legal reality, the world will have taken the first concrete step towards answering the call of Hibakusha to banish nuclear weapons from the face of the earth, and to guarantee No more Hiroshima; no more Nagasaki.
Lassina Zerbo


Forum : International Day against Nuclear Tests - 29 August

Events :  Informal Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly  to mark the 2015 Observance of the International Day against Nuclear Tests, Thursday September 10th.

Exhibition : To mark this year’s International Day Against Nuclear Tests an exhibition of art related to nuclear testing and nuclear weapons by artists from Austria, China, Kazakhstan, and the United States was on display at the Vienna International Centre. It culminated in a formal event on the eve of the Day itself which was attended by a large number of representatives of the Vienna diplomatic community, NGOs and media. The Chinese Artists’ Association and the Permanent Mission of Kazakhstan to the International Organizations in Vienna supported the exhibition and the event.

International Day against Nuclear Tests 2015 – Towards a Safer World

International Day for the Remembrance of Slave Trade and of its Abolition 2015, August 23

International Day for the Remembrance of Slave Trade and of its Abolition, August 23.


International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition was first celebrated in a number of countries, in particular in Haiti (23 August 1998) and Goree in Senegal (23 August 1999). Cultural events and debates too were organized. The year 2001 saw the participation of the Mulhouse Textile Museum in France in the form of a workshop for fabrics called "Indiennes de Traite" (a type of calico) which served as currency for the exchange of slaves in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Circular CL/3494 of 29 July 1998 from the Director-General to Ministers of Culture invites all the Member States to organize events to mark 23 August each year. 

The UNESCO Executive Board adopted Resolution 29 C/40 at its 29th session.


“Artists and the memory of slavery: resistance, creative freedom and legacies”

Programme and Participants of the seminar Artists and the memory of slavery: resistance, creative freedom and legacies; (4, september 2015)

Generations of artists have, ever since the abolitions of slavery, seized, revisited, rehabilitated, and transmitted, when their turn came, these esthetic legacies in diverse areas of creation. They have also taken over the historical, political, social, and identity questions inherited from colonial history as to draw new horizons to individual and intercultural relations.

To address these issues, UNESCO Slave Route Project along with the cultural association "Fait à Cuba" and Vallois gallery organize an event from 4 to 11 September in Paris consisting of a seminar, an exhibition and a performance. These activities will be offering a plural reflection on the relation that contemporary artists hold to the history and memory of slavery.
- How does this tragic history, still ill-known on the scientific field of research and marginalized by the media, feed artistic creation in its most contemporary forms?
- Does artistic creation enable to voice and crystallize new viewpoints on this complex phenomenon as well as to generate unprecedented overcomings?
- How do artists draw inspiration from, refer to, and carry this painful memory but also transcend it so as to achieve universality?

FORUM : 23 August - Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition

Tuesday, 18 August 2015

World Humanitarian Day 2015, August 19.





2015年的主题:激励世界人道精神.
Тема Дня 2015 года: «Станьте проводником идей гуманизма»
Thème 2015 : Inspirer l'humanité

 


On World Humanitarian Day, we honour the selfless dedication and sacrifice of workers and volunteers from around the world who devote themselves – often at great personal risk – to assisting the world’s most vulnerable people.
This year, more than 100 million women, men and children need life-saving humanitarian assistance.  The amount of people affected by conflict has reached levels not seen since the Second World War, while the number of those affected by natural and human-induced disasters remains profound. 
On this Day we also celebrate our common humanity.  The families and communities struggling to survive in today’s emergencies do so with resilience and dignity.  They need and deserve our renewed commitment to do all we can to provide them with the means for a better future.
Each one of us can make a difference. In a world that is ever more digitally connected, each of us has the power and responsibility to inspire our fellow human beings to act to help others and create a more humane world.
On this World Humanitarian Day I urge everyone to show solidarity as global citizens by signing up to the #ShareHumanity campaign.  By donating your social media feeds for just one day you can promote humanitarian action and help to give a voice to the voiceless by sharing their stories of crisis, hope and resilience.
Next May, Istanbul, Turkey, will host the first World Humanitarian Summit.  The Summit will provide a platform for Heads of State and Government and leaders from civil society, the private sector, crisis-affected communities and multilateral organizations to announce bold new partnerships
and initiatives that will vastly reduce suffering and at the same time reinforce the 2030 agenda
for sustainable development.
I count on the support of all sectors of society to make the World Humanitarian Summit
a success.  Together we can and must build a more humane world with a stronger commitment
to life-saving humanitarian action.

Ban Ki-moon, United Nations.



As the World Food Programme marks August 19 as World Humanitarian Day – the 12th anniversary of the tragic deaths of 22 colleagues in the bombing of the United Nations office in Baghdad – we mourn and cherish those members of our own family taken from us. Over the last year, four of our colleagues in South Sudan have disappeared without a trace. We have searched relentlessly for news of their whereabouts, hoping for the best but fearing the worst.  After many months, we must sadly conclude that they are no longer alive.

Our thoughts are with their families. We will remember their dedication, compassion and courage.

As we honour the recently fallen, we also pay tribute to the many in WFP and across the humanitarian community selflessly striving day in, day out, to meet the pressing needs of the vulnerable, hungry poor in hotspots around the world. With 80 percent of humanitarian work now in countries and regions affected by conflict, the task of giving life-saving assistance is increasingly, for too many colleagues, life-threatening.

Today, too often, feeding the hungry demands unlimited courage and boundless commitment from those on the front line. Humanitarians, including our WFP colleagues, must be fearless. I am honoured to say I work with 14,000 of the bravest, hardest working people on earth. During my tenure as WFP Executive Director, I’ve witnessed their personal sacrifices, shared their tears and personally witnessed the losses. Just a few days ago, I stood in the ruins of a colleague’s home in the Yemeni capital, Sana’a.
As securing the access we need to provide impartial assistance becomes increasingly difficult in places like Yemen and South Sudan, more is asked of humanitarian actors than ever before. We thank all those who serve for the inspiration they give all of us every day.

  Ertharin Cousin, World Food Programme.
 

Statement by Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, UNFPA. World Humanitarian Day is observed on August 19, 2015.

Nearly 60 million people are forcibly displaced by conflict, war and persecution, the largest number since the United Nations was created 70 years ago in the ashes of the Second World War. And due to climate change, the frequency and severity of natural disasters is increasing, with more than 400 disasters last year alone.

Today on World Humanitarian Day, we express strong solidarity with the women, men, youth and children who are suffering from humanitarian emergencies worldwide. And we salute the humanitarian workers who strive to meet their needs and uphold human rights and dignity. UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, joins the #ShareHumanity campaign to tell the stories behind humanitarian crises.

Zainab and Nigo, were abducted by Boko Haram in Nigeria, but managed to escape. Their courage has been an inspiration to others. “Despite the fear, I did not lose hope,” Nigo said. In Afghanistan, Zarmina was abducted and forced into sexual slavery. Then, her mother organized to rescue her. UNFPA supports survivors like Nigo, Zainab and Zarmina, as we work to prevent and respond to gender-based violence. UNFPA also works closely with community members, who are often the best, most knowledgeable emergency responders.

Sita Paudel, a paralegal in Nepal, survived the devastating earthquake, and knew she had to take action. She became an organizer, bringing aid to remote villages and taking vulnerable women and girls to UNFPA-supported services. “I know how bad the situation is for women out there,” she said. In Colombia, Viviana was displaced by violence and became pregnant while still a teenager, and went on to become a youth leader. While fleeing Syria, Amir was shot and even declared dead. But he survived and is a volunteer at a UNFPA-supported centre.

UNFPA works to provide sexual and reproductive health services to ensure safe birth even in the most difficult circumstances. Chantal walked for four days to a refugee camp after fleeing Burundi. “I had expected the worst to happen,” she said. Instead, she gave birth safely at a maternity centre. Isra'a, a Syrian refugee, lost her baby when she could not afford the medical bills. But today, she is pregnant again and receiving care through UNFPA. To escape floods in Malawi, Alimanda climbed high into a tree when she was eight months pregnant. She survived and later gave birth to a healthy baby girl.  In Vanuatu after Cyclone Pam, Katherine Silas sought family planning, so she could make her own choices and plan for the future. In Liberia, Comfort Fayiah gave birth in the rain, on the street, to twins, as Ebola overtook health workers, hospitals and clinics. UNFPA is working with partners to build sustainable and resilient health systems.

Today on World Humanitarian Day, and every day, UNFPA stands strong for the human rights and inherent dignity of every human being. To improve humanitarian effectiveness, we call for increased action and funding for sexual and reproductive health services, for tackling gender-based violence, and for the meaningful participation of affected populations, especially women and young people.


Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, UNFPA.


 Forum : World Humanitarian Day- 19 August.
 #SHAREHUMANITY and join all the people who have already donated their feeds



Serving the-needs of people In conflict

 
Humanitarian effectiveness

 
Reducing vulnerability and managing risk

 
Transformation through innovation


 Links :



Remember the Fallen  : Latest Casualties: January - December 2014
 Here we remember those often forgotten – those who have died in the service of the United Nations – the fallen.

Resources

Tuesday, 11 August 2015

International Youth Day 2015, August 12th.




Темой Международного дня молодежи 2015 года является «Молодежь и гражданская вовлеченность»
Tema 2015: «Participación cívica de los jóvenes»
Theme 2015 : Youth Civic Engagement
 Thème 2015 : « L'engagement civique des jeunes »
2015年的主题为:青年的公民参与
موضوع الاحتفال لعام 2015—إشراك المواطنين الشباب


United Nations Secretary-General's Message for the International Youth Day 2015.

Emerging threats, violent extremism, shifting political conditions, economic turmoil and social transformations are combining to heighten the challenges facing the world’s young people. No one knows better than them the issues at stake or the best way to respond. That is why I am calling on young people to speak out – and I am urging leaders to listen.
As the world changes with unprecedented speed, young people are proving to be invaluable partners who can advance meaningful solutions. Youth movements and student groups are challenging traditional power structures and advocating a new social contract between States and societies. Young leaders have contributed fresh ideas, taken proactive measures, and mobilized through social media as never before.
I applaud the millions of young people who are protesting for rights and participation, addressing staggering levels of youth unemployment, raising their voices against injustice, and advocating global action for people and the planet.
In this landmark year, as leaders prepare to adopt a bold new vision for sustainable development, the engagement of youth is more valuable than ever. At this critical moment in history, I call on young people to demand and foster the dramatic progress so urgently needed in our world.
Volunteerism is an ideal way to improve society – and it is open to virtually everyone. Youth can also join forces with the United Nations as we move from forging the new sustainable development goals to implementing them. That spirit of action is embodied in the theme of this International Day: “Youth and Civic Engagement.”
I stand with the world’s young people in calling for measures to secure human rights, economic progress, environmental stewardship and social inclusion.
This year marks the 70th anniversary of the United Nations Charter and the 20th anniversary of the World Programme of Action for Youth. In support of their aims, my Youth Envoy is helping to mobilize this largest generation of young people in history. As he says, youth engagement can help turn the world we want into the world we deserve. 
Let us all support young people in creating a future where our planet is protected and all people live in dignity.
Ban Ki-moon


International Youth Day is an opportunity to celebrate the creative force and the innovative impetus that young people bring to every society. This year’s theme – “Youth Civic Engagement” – emphasizes the role played by the involvement and inclusion of young people in building social cohesion and collective well-being.

From social entrepreneurs to journalists, from voluntary workers to members of community organizations, young people contribute to shaping society to lead it towards political, cultural and economic renewal.
We must support their civic engagement at every level, beginning with recognizing that young people form a separate social group with specific characteristics and expectations. Civic engagement is a way to exploit this potential to enrich society, further human rights and enable improved living conditions for all.
These goals are at the core of UNESCO’s projects, to offer young people the space and skills they need to develop, which reflects on all societies.
That is the spirit of UNESCO’s project to strengthen youth networks in the Mediterranean. Young people must be considered the drivers of change, and not only beneficiaries or targets. That involves reinforcing exchanges and cooperation between generations to ensure that young people are actually involved in developing the policies intended for them. The ninth UNESCO Youth Forum, held in October, will provide a unique platform to convey this message, and I invite young people from all over the world to attend and make their voices heard, to shape the action of world leaders. These voices carry the hope of half of the planet, for a sustainable future for all.
 Young people must be considered the drivers of change, and not only beneficiaries or targets.     

Irina Bokova
UNESCO Director-General
International Youth Day 2015

UNESCO youth Forum - Youth For Change, 26-28 october 2015, Paris

9th UNESCO Youth Forum

UNESCO Paris, France, 26-28 October 2015
This edition’s theme is Young Global Citizens for a Sustainable Planet”, to allow discussion of sustainable development challenges in the post-2015 context, while also maintaining a focus on climate change and related global debates around the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21).
The Forum is an integral part of the 38th session of the UNESCO General Conference.


 Statement of the UNFPA Executive Director for International Youth Day 2015
Investing in the Power of Young People, Transforming our World


Today, UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, commemorates International Youth Day, under the theme, “Youth Civic Engagement,” by celebrating the actions young people around the world take to improve their well-being and that of their communities.

In 65 countries, more than half the population is younger than 24. Denying these young people the right to meaningful participation in decision-making is a gross violation of their human rights and a failure of the democratic process. It is also a waste of human capital that can propel nations towards development.

Young people are driving change towards a better future for all in every corner of the world. They are leading global action on climate change, campaigning to end discrimination, speaking out to uphold democracy and the freedom of speech, connecting our world with innovations in information technology, and building peace in societies ravaged by war.

In a world of increasing conflict, young people must be our strongest partners if peace and security are to win out over war.  We need their fullest capability and broadest engagement for people, the planet and prosperity to flourish.

The next 15 years offer a unique opportunity for a demographic dividend that will accelerate conflict-recovery and sustainable economic growth and development in many countries if we empower, support, educate and create employment for young people today.  Young women and men need protection from violence, and they have a right to access essential education and health services, including for their sexual and reproductive health. They also have the right to be at the tables where decisions and peace are made.

Yet, for the most part, young people remain excluded from decision-making processes. Although 16 per cent of the world’s population is 20-29 years old, this age group represents only 1.6 per cent of parliamentarians, most of whom are men. Young people rarely join political parties, and the majority do not vote in elections.

It is misleading, however, to conclude that young people are uninterested or simply do not care. Today’s young people are better educated and volunteer more for causes than previous generations. They are also a key driving force behind making companies, organizations and governments more socially and environmentally conscious.

To fully participate in the lives of their communities, young people need to overcome multiple legal, social and cultural barriers and discrimination. Adolescent girls, in particular, are often burdened by child marriage, sexual violence, unplanned pregnancies and HIV, preventing their full civic engagement.

In September, world leaders will formally adopt Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a historic, transformative, inclusive, universal agenda for our people and the planet. To have any chance of succeeding in building a better future for humanity, we must remove the obstacles confronted by young people and invest in their health, well-being, education and livelihoods to unleash and leverage their full potential as global citizens. We must ensure that all young people have access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, including comprehensive sexuality education.

UNFPA is proud to work with networks of adolescents and youth to mobilize support for the United Nations Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health.

Our efforts to promote youth leadership and participation enable young people to develop the skills, knowledge and support needed to make informed decisions about their bodies, lives, families, communities, countries and the world.
Together, we can ensure that the post-2015 development agenda promotes the human rights, health and well-being of the largest generation of young people in history.

Together, working in partnership with young people, we can enable them to survive, thrive and transform our world, and deliver a better future for all of us.
 

UNFPA Executive Director
Statement of the UNFPA Executive Director for International Youth Day - See more at: http://www.unfpa.org/news/investing-power-young-people-transforming-our-world#sthash.VBSHEQHw.dpuf

Investing in the Power of Young People, Transforming our World

12 August 2015
Author: UNFPA
Statement of the UNFPA Executive Director for International Youth Day
Today, UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, commemorates International Youth Day, under the theme, “Youth Civic Engagement,” by celebrating the actions young people around the world take to improve their well-being and that of their communities.
In 65 countries, more than half the population is younger than 24. Denying these young people the right to meaningful participation in decision-making is a gross violation of their human rights and a failure of the democratic process. It is also a waste of human capital that can propel nations towards development.
Young people are driving change towards a better future for all in every corner of the world. They are leading global action on climate change, campaigning to end discrimination, speaking out to uphold democracy and the freedom of speech, connecting our world with innovations in information technology, and building peace in societies ravaged by war.
In a world of increasing conflict, young people must be our strongest partners if peace and security are to win out over war.  We need their fullest capability and broadest engagement for people, the planet and prosperity to flourish.
The next 15 years offer a unique opportunity for a demographic dividend that will accelerate conflict-recovery and sustainable economic growth and development in many countries if we empower, support, educate and create employment for young people today.  Young women and men need protection from violence, and they have a right to access essential education and health services, including for their sexual and reproductive health. They also have the right to be at the tables where decisions and peace are made.
Yet, for the most part, young people remain excluded from decision-making processes. Although 16 per cent of the world’s population is 20-29 years old, this age group represents only 1.6 per cent of parliamentarians, most of whom are men. Young people rarely join political parties, and the majority do not vote in elections.
It is misleading, however, to conclude that young people are uninterested or simply do not care. Today’s young people are better educated and volunteer more for causes than previous generations. They are also a key driving force behind making companies, organizations and governments more socially and environmentally conscious.
To fully participate in the lives of their communities, young people need to overcome multiple legal, social and cultural barriers and discrimination. Adolescent girls, in particular, are often burdened by child marriage, sexual violence, unplanned pregnancies and HIV, preventing their full civic engagement.
In September, world leaders will formally adopt Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a historic, transformative, inclusive, universal agenda for our people and the planet. To have any chance of succeeding in building a better future for humanity, we must remove the obstacles confronted by young people and invest in their health, well-being, education and livelihoods to unleash and leverage their full potential as global citizens. We must ensure that all young people have access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, including comprehensive sexuality education.
UNFPA is proud to work with networks of adolescents and youth to mobilize support for the United Nations Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health.
Our efforts to promote youth leadership and participation enable young people to develop the skills, knowledge and support needed to make informed decisions about their bodies, lives, families, communities, countries and the world.
Together, we can ensure that the post-2015 development agenda promotes the human rights, health and well-being of the largest generation of young people in history.
Together, working in partnership with young people, we can enable them to survive, thrive and transform our world, and deliver a better future for all of us.
 
- See more at: http://www.unfpa.org/news/investing-power-young-people-transforming-our-world#sthash.VBSHEQHw.dpuf

Forum : International Youth Day is on August 12 each year.


take part in this year's #YouthDay campaign!




Project
  • Networks of Mediterranean Youth (NET-MED Youth)

    NET-MED Youth is a unique three-year project implemented by UNESCO and funded by the European Union with the aim of building the capacities of youth, enhancing networking among them, engaging them in dialogue with national stakeholders and in the development and revision of public policies.
Event
International Youth Day 2015 events and celebrations Worldwide
  • 2015 Event At The United Nations Headquarters
On 12 August 2015, the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) and the UN Development Programme (UNDP) with the support of the UN Inter-agency Network on Youth Development is organizing an event to commemorate International Youth Day under the theme Youth Civic Engagement. Find more information about the International Youth Day 2015 event by clicking here.( http://undesadspd.org/Youth/InternationalYouthDay/2015/Event.aspx)
  • 2015 Events Around The World
Organize an event to celebrate International Youth Day in your community, school, youth club, or workplace. You can get some ideas from the toolkit here. If you organize an event, let us know about it sending an email to youth@un.org, and we’ll map it on our International Youth Day activities map.
  • 2015 Featured Event: Celebration In The Philippines
The Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth Mr. Ahmad Alhendawiwill mark the International Youth Day with young people from Asia at large and from the Philippines in particular.  On August 12, the Envoy will deliver opening remarks at the 3rd Asian Youth Forum. He will also join the Filipino National Youth Day Celebration with 1,000 young people from the country, UN, government representatives, legislators, civil society partners, and donor organizations.
  • International Youth Day Digital Surge
On 12 August between 9am EST and 3pm EST (New York City time) join the International Youth Day Digital Surge! Use #YouthDay and #YouthNow

  • Online Photo Exhibit: #YouthNow Driving Change
For the month of August, each day we will share a photo and story of a young person driving change in their community. Check out the album here.Join us and share a story of an inspiring young person in your community online using the #YouthDay and #YouthNow.
  • Online Photo Campaign
Share your photos of young people engaging and promoting civic engagement for change using the hashtag #YouthDay.  Selected photo entries will be chosen for the #YouthDay competition, to be selected by UN4Youth Facebook followers. The winning photo will be showcased at the International Youth Day event on 12 August in UN Headquarters, and online, via @UN4Youth and @undp4youth Social Media platforms. Learn more about the #YouthDay campaign here!
  • Inspiring Quotes On Youth
Check out inspiring quotes from the world leaders and UN Officials celebrating youth. We will be uploading them on twitter at @UNYouthEnvoy. Follow #YouthDay and #YouthNow
Links

Publications
News

Sunday, 9 August 2015

International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples 2015, August 9






2015年主题:“2015年后发展议程:确保土著人民的健康与福祉”
Tema 2015: «Agenda después de 2015: Garantizar la salud y el bienestar de los pueblos indígenas».
Тема в 2015 году: «Повестка дня на период после 2015 года: обеспечение здоровья и благополучия коренных народов» 
Thème 2015 - « Programme pour l’après-2015 : Garantir santé et bien-être aux peuples autochtones »
2015 Theme: "Post 2015 Agenda: Ensuring indigenous peoples' health and well-being".
موضوع 2015: "جدول أعمال ما بعد 2015: ضمان رخاء الشعوب الأصلية وصحتها"



This year, as the United Nations commemorates its 70th anniversary, we can look back on major advances for humanity. The 2007 adoption by the General Assembly of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was one of many successes achieved through the fruitful partnership between indigenous peoples and United Nations Member States.
The year also marks a watershed in human development. The period of the Millennium Development Goals is drawing to a close to be succeeded by a post-2015 development agenda designed to advance inclusion and shared prosperity. This people’s agenda is a concrete plan of action for ending poverty in all its dimensions, irreversibly, everywhere, and leaving no one behind.
On this International Day, we are focusing attention on the health and well-being of the world’s indigenous peoples. The Declaration affirms the right to maintain indigenous health practices as well as to have access to all social and health services for the enjoyment of the highest standards of physical and mental health. We must make every effort to support indigenous peoples’ rights and aspirations as affirmed in the Declaration.
Indigenous peoples face a wide range of challenges to their health and well-being. Most are eminently preventable. They include inadequate sanitation and housing, lack of prenatal care, widespread violence against women, and high rates of diabetes, drug and alcohol abuse, youth suicide and infant mortality. These issues must be urgently addressed as part of the post-2015 development agenda in culturally appropriate ways that meet indigenous peoples’ conceptions of and aspirations for well-being.
On this International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, I call on the international community to ensure that they are not left behind. To create a better, more equitable future, let us commit to do more to improve the health and well-being of indigenous peoples
Ban Ki-moon
Foreword to the State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 
By Mr. Wu Hongbo, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs


Over the past two decades, international efforts have been made to improve the rights of indigenous peoples, to bring awareness to their issues, including their engagement in developing policy and programmes in order to improve their livelihoods. In the First Decade of the World’s Indigenous People (1995 – 2004) the United Nations created the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues as well as the Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples. 
 
During the Second Decade of the World’s Indigenous People (2005 – 2015), there have been further initiatives such as the creation of Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in September 2007 was a major step for the United Nations as the Declaration had been debated for over twenty years. The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues is an advisory body to the Economic and Social Council with a mandate to discuss indigenous issues related to economic and social development, culture, the environment, education, health and human rights. At its twelfth session, the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues reviewed health as one of its mandated areas and stated the right to health materializes through the well-being of an individual as well as the social, emotional, spiritual and cultural well-being of the whole community.

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples states that indigenous peoples have the right to be actively involved in developing and determining their health programmes; the right to their traditional medicines, maintain their health practices, and the equal right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health. Unfortunately, indigenous peoples suffer higher rates of ill health and have dramatically shorter life expectancy than other groups living in the same countries. This inequity results in indigenous peoples suffering unacceptable health problems and they are more likely to experience disabilities and dying at a younger age than their non-indigenous counterparts.

Indigenous peoples’ health status is severely affected by their living conditions, income levels, employment rates, access to safe water, sanitation, health services and food availability. Indigenous peoples are facing destruction to their lands, territories and resources, which are essential to their very survival. Other threats include climate change and environmental contamination (heavy metals, industrial gases and effluent wastes).

Indigenous peoples also experience major structural barriers in accessing health care. These include geographical isolation and poverty which results in not having the means to pay the high cost for transport or treatment. This is further compounded by discrimination, racism and a lack of cultural understanding and sensitivity. Many health systems do not reflect the social and cultural practices and beliefs of indigenous peoples.

At the same time, it is often difficult to obtain a global assessment of indigenous peoples’ health status because of the lack of data. There has to be more work undertaken towards building on existing data collection systems to include data on indigenous peoples and their communities.
 
This publication sets out to examine the major challenges for indigenous peoples to obtain adequate access to and utilization of quality health care services. It provides an important background to many of the health issues that indigenous peoples are currently facing. Improving indigenous peoples’ health remains a critical challenge for indigenous peoples, States and the United Nations.
 




This year's theme puts a spotlight on the issue of indigenous peoples' access to health care services, as improving indigenous peoples’ health remains a critical challenge for indigenous peoples, Member States and the United Nations. The “State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, Volume II”, which will be launched at the UN Headquarters event in observance of the International Day, provides important background information on the topic






Events : The event will be webcast live on webtv.un.org. Read the Press Release.
Monday, 10 August 2015 
3:00 – 6:00pm, ECOSOC Chamber

The observance of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples will take place on Monday, 10 August 2015 in ECOSOC Chamber, from 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.
As part of the commemoration of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, the Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and the Department of Public Information is organizing an event that will bring together indigenous peoples organizations, UN agencies, Member States and the general public. This year the theme will be on “Post 2015 Agenda: Ensuring indigenous peoples health and well-being”.
To register for this event please send an email to Mr. Nicolas Magnien at magnien@un.org and Mr. Arturo Requesens at requesens@un.org indicating full name and organization affiliation. You will receive an email confirming your registration. The deadline to register to attend the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is Tuesday, 4 August 2015.

Holders of valid UNHQ grounds passes do not need to register.


Resources :


Wednesday, 29 July 2015

International Day of Friendship 2015, July 30th.







The International Day of Friendship was initiated by an individual who had a simple but profound vision: that the forces of animosity and hatred in our world are no match for the power of the human spirit.
I had the opportunity, earlier this year in Paraguay, to commend that pioneer, Dr. Ramón Bracho, for his conviction that just as friendship builds bridges between people, it can also inspire peace in our world.
This is of paramount importance as we confront the discrimination, malice and cruelty that drive conflicts and atrocities afflicting millions of people today. We must counter these destructive trends with a renewed commitment to finding our common humanity and fostering shared progress.
On this International Day of Friendship, let us strengthen bonds among individuals and generate greater respect and understanding in our world.

Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary-General.


FORUMInternational Day of Friendship - 30 July

Want More Close Friends?

Although people have often dismissed online social media as the domain of the lonely, or an escape from the deep connections made in the “real” world, our most recent data over at the Science of Friendship project pokes holes in that assumption. People are not only making friends online, they are making deep and meaningful friendships. Over 68% of those surveyed* made a friend they considered a close friend in the last year, and over 80% of those close friendships were made online. That’s over 54% of people who made a close friend online in the last year.

The science of Friendship