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Wednesday, 23 March 2016

World Meteorological Day 2016, March 23.

 
 
 
 
 
 




MESSAGE ON THE OCCASION OF  WORLD METEOROLOGICAL DAY 2016 BY PETTERI TAALAS SECRETARY-GENERAL WORLD METEOROLOGICAL ORGANIZATION.

Climate change is affecting our natural and human environment. Our emissions of greenhouse gases continue to rise, and the temperature of the lower atmosphere and the ocean is increasing.

Today the Earth is already 1°C hotter than at the start of the twentieth century. The international community has unanimously recognized the need for bold action.

Governments adopted the Paris Agreement last year to "hold the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C."

This is an ambitious commitment, and the national plans adopted so far may not be enough to avoid a rise of 3 °C. Yet, we have the knowledge and tools we need to face the future.

WMO and the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services are playing an essential role in building climate-resilient societies. Because of past and present emissions, we must prepare for a future with more hot days, warm nights and heatwaves. This will affect public health and put a strain on our societies. We can reduce health risks related to heat through multi-hazard early warning systems that provide timely alerts to decision-makers, health services and the general public.

We must also address droughts more proactively through integrated drought management. We need to provide decision-makers with guidance on effective policies and land management strategies. We also need to improve access to scientific knowledge and share best practices for coping with drought.

Climate change is also increasing the risk of heavy rains and floods. We can protect lives and property from such hazards through impact-based forecasts. This approach to disaster risk is the best way to empower emergency managers with information they can act on.

The UN Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals establish a powerful global commitment to end poverty. This includes pursuing improved food security and water and sanitation for all. It calls for clean energy and resilient cities. And it promotes the sustainable management of natural ecosystems.

Building climate and weather resilient communities is a vital part of this global strategy for achieving sustainable development.

The WMO community will continue to support countries in pursuing sustainable development and tackling climate change through the provision of the best possible science and of operational services for weather, climate, hydrology, oceans and the environment.

Thank you


 
 
FORUM :

The theme Hotter, Drier, Wetter. Face the Future highlights the challenges of climate change and the path towards climate-resilient societies.
The world just had its hottest year, hottest five year period and hottest decade on record. 15 of the 16 hottest years on record have occurred this century

Rainfall varies naturally from year to year and from decade to decade, influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and other climate drivers.


Precipitation (rain and snow) varies naturally from year to year and from decade to decade, influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO and other climate drivers.  

Fortunately, the world’s governments are now fully convinced of the scientific evidence of climate change and the need to take urgent action. More research and investment is needed for advancing low-carbon technol- ogies, particularly in the energy sector. But already many policies, technologies and actions are available, and their deployment needs to be scaled up. Individual citizens, community leaders, businesses, civil society organiza- tions, governments and the United Nations system must all contribute


The increase in hot days, warm nights and heatwaves will affect public health. These risks can be reduced by heat-health early warning systems that provide timely alerts to decision-makers, health services and the general public.
Droughts must be addressed more proactively through integrated drought management, which embraces guidance on effective policies and land management strategies and shares best practices for coping with drought.
In the event of heavy precipitation and floods, impact-based forecasts enable emergency managers to be prepared in advance. Integrated flood management is a long-term holistic approach to minimizing the risks of flooding.
Building climate and weather resilient communities is a vital part of the global strategy for achieving sustainable development. The WMO community will continue to support countries in pursuing sustainable development and tackling climate change through the provision of the best possible science and of operational services for weather, climate, hydrology, oceans and the environment.
 

Press Briefing, 11:15 am, Wednesday 23 March
World Meteorological Day: Hotter, Drier, Wetter. Face the Future
 
WMO - Press Conference: the Global Climate and Extreme Weather Events
(Geneva, 21 March 2016) 
Speakers:
· Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General
· Omar Baddour, Scientific Coordinator
 
 
 
 
 
 EVENTS : World Met Day Programme 2016 - +World Meteorological Organization (WMO) .

WEDNESDAY, 23 MARCH/ WMO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA
 



WEDNESDAY, 23 MARCH/ WMO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA
World Meteorological Day 2016
World Meteorological Day 2016 in the medias
 
 

14:30 Curtain-­‐raiser video Emcee: Sylvie Castonguay
 
14:35 Welcome address
Mr Petteri Taalas Secretary-­‐General of
the World Meteorological Organization (WMO)

14:45 Student from Jean Callas primary school,
Ferney Voltaire and the video “M. Tout-­‐le-­‐Monde”

14:55 Statement by Special Guest Ms Valérie Masson-­‐Delmotte, Co-­‐Chair, Working Group I of the
WMO/UNEP Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

15:15 El Niño animation

15:20 Outcomes of the Ferney Model United Nations
(FerMUN) hosted by WMO in January 2016 Student
from International Lycée of Ferney-­‐Voltaire

15:30 Young Earth System Scientists community

15:40 Musical interlude

15:50 Statement by Guest Speaker Mr Robert
Glasser, Special Representative of the Secretary-­‐General for Disaster Risk Reduction, UN
International Strategy for Disaster Risk (UNISDR)

16:10 Discussion

16:35 Close and visit of Photo Exhibit of WMO 2016
calendar

16:45 WMO reception (Attic Restaurant)










Links & Resources  :

 World Meteorological Day commemorates the coming into force on 23 March 1950 of the Convention establishing the World Meteorological Organization. It showcases the essential contribution of National Meteorological and Hydrological Services to the safety and wellbeing of society.



Weather forecasts & Warnings




2015 was the Warmest year on record by far, 0.76 °C above 1961–1990 average



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