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Friday, 8 August 2014

International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples 2014, 9 August




 
Aboriginal People are a steady beating heart at the centre of our Australian Spiritual Identity.

2014 Theme: "Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples"
Тема в 2014 году: «Преодоление разрыва: осуществление прав коренных народов» 
2014年主题:“弥补差距:落实土著人民的权利”
Thème 2014 : « Combler le fossé : appliquer des droits des peuples autochtones »
Tema 2014: «Acortando las diferencias: aplicación de los derechos de los pueblos indígenas»
موضوع 2014: "سد الفجوة: تنفيذ حقوق الشعوب الأصلية"



This year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples comes at a critical moment as the world endeavours to meet the Millennium Development Goals, forge a new vision for sustainable development and prepare the groundwork for the adoption of a new legal climate agreement – all by 2015.
Indigenous peoples have a central interest in these objectives – and can act as powerful agents of progress. In order for them to contribute to our common future, we must secure their rights.
The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples establishes minimum standards for their survival, dignity, well-being and rights. But huge gaps remain between those ideals and the circumstances facing most of the world’s indigenous peoples.
While a number of countries have constitutional and legislative frameworks that recognize indigenous peoples, many others do not, leaving their lives and lands exposed to threats. Historical injustices have all too often resulted in exclusion and poverty.  Power structures have and continue to create obstacles to indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination. They are among those who tend to face comparatively higher barriers to progress. The negative effects reverberate beyond indigenous communities, affecting societies as a whole.
The interests of the indigenous peoples must be part of the new development agenda in order for it to succeed.
As we prepare for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples in September, I urge all Member States to work in full partnership with indigenous peoples and their representatives to improve their lives and opportunities.

Together, let us recognize and celebrate the valuable and distinctive identities of indigenous peoples around the world. Let us work even harder to empower them and support their aspirations.
On this International Day for the World’s Indigenous Peoples, I call on all partners to join the United Nations in promoting and protecting their rights which are essential for our common future.


Ban Ki-moon

 

 Remarks By H.E. Mr. Crispin Gregoire Special Advisor to the President On behalf of H.E. Mr. John W. Ashe President of the 68 th Session of the United Nations General Assembly.International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2014

“Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples”
New York, 8 August 2014.

Excellencies,Distinguished Delegates, Vice-Chairperson of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Under-Secretary General of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs,Director of the Division for Social Policy and Development,

Special Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

On behalf of the President of the General Assembly, I have the great honour to join the world community to day in commemorating this year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. This worthy tradition dates back to 1994 and was renewed by our Assembly of nations in resolution 59/174 as part of efforts to strengthen international cooperation to support indigenous people in areas such as human rights, the environment, development, education and health.
With the Second International Decade of the World's Indigenous People coming to a close and the World Conference on Indigenous People’s rapidly approaching, this year carries particular importance and significance.

Excellencies, Two historic decades have passed since the Vienna Declaration and they have been an important testament to the struggles and achievements of indigenous peoples. The first decade saw a number of accomplishments, including: United Nations entities, Member States, and Indigenous Peoples’organizations working together to advance the rights of indigenous peoples; the establishment of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; the appointment by the Human Rights Commission of the Special Rapporteur; and demonstrated effectiveness by Indigenous Peoples to ensuring that indigenous issues are inserted into a number of international settings.

During the course of the Second Decade, wehave witnessed the historic adoption by the General Assembly of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples,continuous mobilization by Indigenous Peoples towards more effective articulation of their plight and challenges, as well as decisive steps by some governments and international organisations to accord greater attention to the rights and improved well-being of Indigenous Peoples.

As we observe this year’s International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples,in the final and crucial year of this second decade, we hearken back to past achievements and prepare for
the future action that is necessary to realize our commitments. This year’s focus, “ bridging the gap through implementing the rights of Indigenous Peoples” is an apt reminder that there is still a long way to go in the journey towards the concerted and decisive action required to address the rights of Indigenous Peoples.In this regard, it is not just the gap between the indigenous and the non-indigenous withincountries that needs to be bridged at an accelerated pace,but the gap between the promise of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (A/Res/61/295) and the reality of its implementation.

The first “World Conference on Indigenous Peoples” to be held on the 22nd and the 23rd of September this year marks an important milestonein our efforts.In the preparation for the World Conference, the President is working closely with Indigenous Peoples and Member States to ensure that this seminal event will be a success.
Along with his four Advisers, two from Member States and two from Indigenous Peoples, he is committed to ensuring that the World Conference brings about real and effective change for the benefit of all Indigenous Peoples. He is pleased to inform that the team is working hard on preparing a clear, concise and action-oriented outcome document that will hopefully serve as a robust platform for enhanced cooperation between Member States and Indigenous Peoples.

Distinguished Guests, The historical marginalization of indigenous peoples is still an unfortunate reality in today’s world and in many places, daunting obstacles are a part of daily life.
As the preamble of the Alta Document so eloquently lays out, past injustices have led to current challenges. This preamble further reaffirms that the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should be the foundation of all our efforts moving forward. Yet,its value will remain severely limited if words are not followed up with deeds, and theories are not put into practice. 
Through the three pillars of engagement–the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples;the United Nations has undertaken important steps towards greater recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples. What is required now is more decisive action at international and national levels to ensure the full implementation of the provisions of the Declaration. Our commemoration today is both a prelude and a bridge to the World Conference. I hope that the Outcome Document we ultimately adopt this September will serve to consolidate the achievements of the past as well as stimulate efforts for the future.

On this International Day, let me salute the Indigenous Peoples of the world and express my fervent hope that the international community will work steadfastly with you towards the realization of your inalienable rights as enshrined in the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

May this Day be both a reaffirmation of the international community ’s solidarity with you, as well as an important opportunity to lay the found ation for the Conference next month.

Thank you.

***

Message of Dr Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, Executive Director, UN WomenInternational Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2014.

Today, August 8, is the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. On behalf of UN Women, I join with people around the world in commending and commemorating the achievements and struggles of indigenous peoples.

This year’s theme is Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples. This is particularly relevant to indigenous women and girls. In their struggle for equality, they have
shown their diverse capacities as human rights defenders, decision makers and implementers, despite discrimination and marginalization.

The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues estimates that there are 370 million indigenous peoples living in more than 90 countries across the world. Imagine how much more women in all these countries could contribute if they had equal opportunities to realize their full potential. UN Women applauds the focus on this issue, as global leaders embark on determining the sustainable development framework. We join indigenous peoples around the world in calling for the full implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples — the comprehensive blueprint for addressing the inequalities and discrimination that indigenous communities have faced for centuries.

In October 2013, indigenous women’s organizations and individuals came together with UN Women and other partners in Lima, Peru, to adopt the Lima Position and Plan of Action. It calls
for urgent, concerted efforts to address challenges facing indigenous women in many parts of the world: persistent violence, poverty, discrimination, racism, and limited access to services
and productive resources. The Plan of Action also calls for indigenous women’s full and equal participation in decision-making at all levels.

These principles and values inform UN Women’s work with indigenous women and their communities around the world. We also work closely with indigenous women's organizations through our Civil Society Advisory Groups. This celebration of the International Day is just the start of an important new epoch in progress.

It is our hope that the international community will keep its promises to indigenous women and girls and take measures that fulfill their aspirations for equality, freedom, and justice.

Message of Francis Gurry, Director General, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) on the occasion of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People, August 9, 2014.


Indigenous Peoples’ knowledge and cultures contribute to the richness of the world’s innovation and creativity. Their traditional practices contribute to equitable development and proper management of the environment. Indigenous Peoples’ traditional knowledge (TK) and traditional cultural expressions (TCEs) are essential for the affirmation of their distinct cultural identity.

The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) leads the development of a balanced and effective international intellectual property system that enables innovation and creativity for the benefit of all. Intellectual property can play a key role in the economic, social and cultural empowerment of Indigenous Peoples. The WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore (IGC) is currently working to reach agreement on an international legal instrument or instruments which will ensure the effective protection of TK and TCEs, and regulation of the interface between intellectual property and genetic resources. Indigenous Peoples and local communities are important actors in achieving a universal intellectual property system which further recognizes all forms of innovation and creativity and safeguards the unique status and identity of Indigenous Peoples.

This year’s theme for the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples: “Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples”, viewed in an intellectual property context, makes a direct reference to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, particularly Article 31, which refers to the “right of indigenous peoples to maintain, control, protect and develop their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expression”. Article 31 contributes to providing guidance to WIPO’s work on the protection of TK and TCEs.

WIPO Member States have established several mechanisms for Indigenous Peoples and local communities to make substantive contributions to the WIPO negotiations. Representatives of Indigenous Peoples and local communities participate directly – and very valuably - in these negotiations.

WIPO’s capacity-strengthening activities also address the interests and concerns of Indigenous Peoples and local communities, including our practical workshop for Indigenous Peoples and local communities on intellectual property and TK. WIPO’s Indigenous Fellow Program offers the opportunity for an Indigenous Fellow to work within WIPO’s Traditional Knowledge Division.
It is with deep appreciation and respect that the WIPO joins today in celebrating the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples and we look forward to maintaining our valuable and warm collaboration with Indigenous Peoples and local communities.”

Message from Ms Irina Bokova,Director-General of UNESCO on the occasion of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous People 9 August 2014.



In September, the United Nations General Assembly will hold the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples. This will review progress towards the fulfilment of indigenous peoples’ rights, and efforts to implement the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
 
Major gaps remain at all levels, which UNESCO is committed to helping to bridge. UNESCO is leading the way in education with two angles of action–first, to promote the use and survival of indigenous cultures, languages, knowledge, traditions and identity, and second, to provide knowledge and skills that enable indigenous peoples to participate fully and equally in the national and international community. We are taking this forward also in the context of the post-2015 development agenda. With our partners, we are advocating for an ambitious and comprehensive education goal that provides due respect to local knowledge systems, including those of indigenous peoples.
 

In the field of culture, UNESCO is working with States to recognize the role of culture as an enabler and a driver of inclusive, sustainable development. For effective and meaningful ownership of all development efforts, we must build on cultural diversity through all public policies and measures.
 

In December 2013, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a third milestone resolution on “Culture and Sustainable Development” (A/C.2/68/L.69). This acknowledges the linkages between culture and the three pillars of sustainable development, as well as with peace and security, encouraging States to give due
consideration to culture in the post-2015 development agenda. Highlighting the link between cultural and biological diversity, the Resolution also underlines the positive contribution of local and indigenous knowledge in tackling environmental challenges.
 

UNESCO’s Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems programme is the spearhead of our action to advance respect for indigenous peoples’ rights to maintain, control, protect and develop their traditional knowledge, and to participate in environmental decision-making.
To this end, we are working to promote the role of indigenous kn owledge in major intergovernmental environmental processes. The 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was important in this respect, concluding that knowledge systems, “including indigenous peoples’ holistic views of community and environment, are a major resource for adapting to climate change”.
 
The Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services has adopted recognition of indigenous and local knowledge as one of its operating principles with a Task Force focusing on this issue, for which UNESCO has been designated as the technical support unit.

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous People is a moment to acknowledge the vital contribution of indigenous peoples to innovation and creativity, to sustainable development as well as to cultural diversity. It is also an opportunity for all to mobilise to bridge the gaps that remain to the fulfilment of indigenous peoples’ rights. This is essential today and tomorrow, as we shape the new post-2015 development agenda.

Irina Bokova


Special event at UN Headquarters

Friday, 8 August 2014
3:00 – 6:00pm, ECOSOC Chamber
 " Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples" UNDESADSPD

A special event at UN Headquarters in New York will be held on Friday, 8 August, starting at 3:00pm, featuring the UN Secretary-General, the President of the General Assembly, the Vice-Chairperson of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, a member state delegate, a representative of the Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights, and an indigenous representative. The event will be webcast live at webtv.un.org. See the full programme.PDF document
Representatives of Member States, UN agencies, indigenous peoples’ organizations, non-governmental organizations and the media are invited to attend. Please note that no invitation letters are being issued for this event.
Representative of Member States should confirm their attendance to Mr. Arturo Requesens at requesens@un.org by 6 August at 6pm.

Those who wish to attend the event but do not hold a UN grounds pass must confirm their participation to Berta Bravo at bravo@un.org by 6pm (NY time) of 4 August indicating name, affiliation and contact information.
After successfully registering, participants should pick up their passes at the UN entrance on 1st Avenue at 47th Street, outside the gate, between 2:15pm and 3:00pm on 8 August.


Commemoration of the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples
Theme: “Bridging the gap: implementing the rights of indigenous peoples”.



Co-organized by the Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Division for Social Policy and Development, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, the Department of Public Information and the NGO Committee on the International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples.

 

The World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 2014


The General Assembly, in its resolution 65/198 pdf of 21 December 2010, decided to organize a high-level plenary meeting of the General Assembly, to be known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, in order to share perspectives and best practices on the realization of the rights of indigenous peoples, including pursuing the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
In its resolution 66/296, the General Assembly further decided that the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples would be held on 22 September 2014 and in the afternoon of 23 September 2014 in New York.
The World Conference will be composed of two plenary meetings in the form of an opening and a closing session, three interactive round-table discussions and one interactive panel discussion, with the opening meeting beginning at 9 a.m. on 22 September 2014, followed, in the afternoon, by two round-table discussions taking place simultaneously.
To provide valuable input into the preparatory process for the World Conference, the President of the General Assembly organized on 17 and 18 June 2014 an informal interactive hearing with representatives of indigenous peoples and representatives of entities of the United Nations system, academic institutions, national human rights institutions, parliamentarians, civil society and non-governmental organizations, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the present resolution.
The World Conference will result in a concise, action-oriented outcome document prepared on the basis of inclusive and open informal consultations with Member States and indigenous peoples.





 Resources


RELATED INFORMATION

- See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-people-2014/#sthash.g4Ktu1O6.dpuf

RELATED INFORMATION

- See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-people-2014/#sthash.g4Ktu1O6.dpuf

There's so much more work to be done on behalf of indigenous societies all over the world, and for that we need your help. IDWID 2014 Publication



Indigenous peoples in the Americas continue the long struggle to have their rights respected, to defend their ancestral lands, resources, and ways of life. Indigenous men and women have risen above discrimination, attacks and injustices and stepped forward in defence of their rights, demanding from States concrete measures that protect their lives, livelihoods and territories. On 9 August, UN International Day of Indigenous peoples, Amnesty International would like to add its voice to the millions of Indigenous peoples in the Americas to ensure their rights are respected.

 
° International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)


Our Responsibility to the Seventh Generation - The Healing Circle. 
Read more on http://www.iisd.org/pdf/seventh_gen.pdf

Traditionally, Healing Circles begin in the East and progress clockwise to South, West, and end in the North.

- the East represents the child or the beginning;
- the South represents Youth;
- the West represents Adulthood; and
- the North represents Elders.

Aboriginal world views reflect an interconnectedness between all living forms and consider each of these forms as sacred. Cycles within nature, such as the seasons of spring, summer, fall, and winter, are a main teacher of Indigenous peoples and form the basis of belief systems. Circles, being inherently non-hierarchical and inclusive, represent respect, equality, continuity and interconnectedness. The image of a circle is recognized by many nations and territories, however, each nation and culture may have their own unique meanings associated with the circle.



Our Responsibility to the Seventh Generation - The Healing Circle.

State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2014.

Across the world, minorities and indigenous peoples are disproportionately exposed to hatred. From intimidation and verbal abuse to targeted violence and mass killing, this hatred often reflects and reinforces existing patterns of exclusion.

This year's edition of State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples highlights how hate speech and hate crime, though frequently unreported or unacknowledged, continue to impact on every aspect of their lives.

The volume also documents many of the initiatives being taken to promote positive change and the different ways that governments, civil society and communities can strengthen protections for minorities and indigenous peoples.

IDWID 2014 Publication
International Day of the World's Indigenous People - See more at: http://unpo.org/article/17412#sthash.kNFc7qxR.dpuf



World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples

World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples
The Directory is a unique resource for activists, journalists, academics and decision-makers.
It provides a country-by-country profile of the history and contemporary situation as they relate to minorities and indigenous peoples. The Directory is updated regularly by MRG researchers.
Click here to launch the Directory: http://www.minorityrights.org/directory
- See more at: http://www.minorityrights.org/744/directory/world-directory-of-minorities-and-indigenous-peoples.html#sthash.sR44OUsF.dpuf

 The Directory is a unique resource for activists, journalists, academics and decision-makers.  It provides a country-by-country profile of the history and contemporary situation as they relate to minorities and indigenous peoples. The Directory is updated regularly by MRG researchers. 


World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples

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