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Monday, 11 August 2014

International Youth Day 2014, August 12th.

 


2014 International Youth Day: Youth and Mental Health.
Темой Международного дня молодежи 2014 года является «Молодежь и психическое здоровье».
 Tema 2014:«Los jóvenes y salud mental».
 Thème de la Journée 2014 : « Les jeunes et la santé mentale ».
 وموضوع اليوم الدولي للشباب لعام 2014 هو "الشباب والصحة النفسية".


Have Your Say on Youth Mental Health



 ǀ Français ǀ Español ǀ (pdf)

A new publication from the United Nations shows that 20 per cent of the world’s young people experience a mental health condition each year.  The risks are especially great as they transition from childhood to adulthood.  Stigma and shame often compound the problem, preventing them from seeking the support they need.  For this year’s observance of International Youth Day, the United Nations wants to help lift the veil that keeps young people locked in a chamber of isolation and silence.
The barriers can be overwhelming, particularly in countries where the issue of mental health is ignored and there is a lack of investment in mental health services.  Too often, owing to neglect and irrational fear, persons with mental health conditions are marginalized not only from having a role in the design and implementation of development policies and programmes but even from basic care.  This leaves them more vulnerable to poverty, violence and social exclusion, and has a negative impact on society as a whole.
Young people who are already considered vulnerable, such as homeless youth, those involved in the juvenile justice system, orphaned youth and those having experienced conflict situations, are often more susceptible to stigma and other barriers, leaving them even more adrift when they are most in need of support.  Let us remember that with understanding and assistance, these young people can flourish, making valuable contributions to our collective future.
We have just about 500 days to reach the Millennium Development Goals.  We must support all young people, especially those who are vulnerable, to succeed in this historic campaign.
Wide-ranging efforts at all levels are needed to raise awareness about the importance of investing in and supporting young people with mental health conditions.  Increased education is crucial in reducing stigma and in changing how we talk about and perceive mental health.
Mental health is how we feel; it is our emotions and well-being.  We all need to take care of our mental health so that we lead satisfying lives.  Let us begin to talk about our mental-health in the same way we talk about our overall health.
As we mark International Youth Day 2014, let us enable youth with mental health conditions to realize their full potential, and let us show that mental health matters to us all.

Ban Ki-moon

Statement

11 August 2014

Statement of the Executive Director, UNFPA

International Youth Day, 12 August 2014 “Mental Health Matters”
French | Spanish | Russian | Arabic
A safe and healthy passage from adolescence into adulthood is the right of every child. Being healthy means not merely the absence of illness, but complete physical, mental and social well-being. An essential component of this is being able to realize one’s potential, cope with the stresses of life, build healthy relationships, work productively and participate fully in society. Yet, the mental health of young people is largely ignored and, as a result, depression is the largest cause of disability, and suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young people worldwide. On this International Youth Day, we declare, ‘Mental Health Matters’!
On their journey to adulthood, adolescents discover who they are, what they aspire to and the risks they face. They come to terms with how their identities relate to those around them and learn to deal with social expectations. Facing stigma and discrimination due to gender, sexuality, HIV, disability or other status can make this passage especially challenging. It is critically important for adolescents to have supportive relationships with teachers, role models and mentors, so that they can emerge into adulthood with positive self-esteem and self-value.
Across the world, 1 in 4 adolescent girls are sexually assaulted and 1 in 3 young women were married before the age of 18. The situation is even worse for millions of adolescents living in areas of conflict or humanitarian crises. When adolescents are prevented from having control over their physical and mental integrity, it has severe consequences for their mental health. The resulting post-traumatic stress disorders and depression multiply the injustice they face and add to the burden of unwanted pregnancies, HIV infection or unsafe abortions. Early exposure to trauma and adversity is an established preventable risk factor for mental disorders.
Being able to access health services is essential for all young people. Yet, young people living with mental health disabilities are prevented from getting the care and treatment they require. Those admitted to psychiatric institutions often face degrading treatment and inhuman living conditions. All young people, but particularly those with mental disabilities, are excluded from community life and denied the opportunity to participate in decision-making that affects their lives. Many young people with mental disabilities are denied the right to vote, marry and have children, affecting their ability to gain access to appropriate care, integrate into society and recover from their illnesses.
Mental health matters, and the international community has much to do to fulfil its obligations to young people. We must ensure the availability of services to prevent, diagnose and treat mental health conditions. We must end the stigma, discrimination and violations of human rights against people with mental disabilities. We must guarantee a safe and healthy passage through adolescence for all.
UNFPA is working in more than 150 countries and territories around the world to ensure that adolescents and youth have the knowledge, skills and services to enable them to exercise their rights, understand their bodies, and make informed decisions about their health and well-being. Through the Action for Adolescent Girls initiative, we are focusing on their health, safety, education, engagement and empowerment. When adolescent girls have knowledge, self-esteem, confidence, friends, mentors and health services, they are more able to exercise their rights. Most importantly, we are making sure young people’s voices and priorities are incorporated in development plans and policies.
- See more at: http://www.unfpa.org/public/cache/offonce/home/news/pid/18102;jsessionid=513E984B84D537F2B6F06A5A80EE5F72.jahia01#sthash.KBZ6I6Je.dpuf
Mental Health Matter - International Youth Day 2014


Youth is a period of dramatic change, and the journey from childhood to adulthood can be complex, raising a host of mental health issues.
 
The theme of this International Youth Day is “ Youth and Mental Health,” under the motto Mental Health Matters. This is an opportunity to raise awareness about the difficulties facing young women and men, including from stigma and discrimination, and to support them so that they can fully achieve their aspirations.

Guided by an Operational Strategy on Youth (2014-2021), UNESCO focusses on the needs of ma rginalized young women and men to promote their full integration into society. We work to support school health programmes, as well as informal and non-formal learning, and by mobilizing the power of information and communication technologies.
At the wider level, we are committed to promoting inclusive integrated policies on youth, in which all youth voices are meaningfully consulted and engaged. In all this, we seek to provide opportunities for young people to develop the skills and competences necessary to transition to adulthood and to make the most of all opportunities offered by societies that are increasingly diverse and undergoing transformation.

This requires seeing young women and men not as objects of policy but as agents of change. It calls for action to promote intergenerational under standing and partnership, to strengthen solidarity and to ensure the full integration of all young women and men in society and the economy. In crafting new policies, we need to draw upon lessons learnt and listen to the needs of young people so as to help them overcome the challenges they face The mental health of young women and men is important for the health of society as a whole. They are a well spring of ideas for innovation and leaders for positive change.We need to support them in every way in order to build with them inclusive,just--and healthy--societies.

Irina Bokova


Statement of the Executive Director, UNFPA on the occasion of the International Youth Day, 12 August 2014 “Mental Health Matters”

UNFPA is working in more than 150 countries and territories around the world to ensure that adolescents and youth have the knowledge, skills and services to enable them to exercise their rights, understand their bodies, and make informed decisions about their health and well-being. Through the Action for Adolescent Girls initiative, we are focusing on their health, safety, education, engagement and empowerment. When adolescent girls have knowledge, self-esteem, confidence, friends, mentors and health services, they are more able to exercise their rights. Most importantly, we are making sure young people’s voices and priorities are incorporated in development plans and policies.


 

From 12 June until International Youth Day on 12 August, the United Nations is running a campaign to draw awareness to the importance of reducing stigma surrounding youth with mental health conditions. We need you to help raise awareness and reduce the shame. Join us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest to help raise awareness! Use hashtags #MentalHealthMatters and#UN4Youth.

 IYD2014 Map of Events
 
 Join the Forum : Have Your Say on Youth Mental Health, International Youth Day is on August 12 each year.




Today, more than ever, young women and men are change-makers, building new realities for themselves and their communities. All over the world, youth are driving social change and innovation, claiming respect for their fundamental human rights and freedoms, and seeking new opportunities to learn and work together for a better future.

UNESCO recognizes this reality, and therefore prioritizes its work with and for youth across all its programmes. The Organization is guided in this by an Operational Strategy on Youth (2014-2021), which is the result of a long process of review and consultation, engaging both young people and Member States. This serves both to consolidate and innovate UNESCO’s action for youth.


What is the UNESCO Strategy on Youth?

The Strategy covers a period of eight years, from 2014 to 2021, and provides the framework for constructive partnerships to be developed with and between youth organizations and youth-related stakeholders. It is built on the premise that youth are key partners and actors for development and peace.

The Strategy puts forward three multidisciplinary and complementary axes of work which incorporate the full range of UNESCO’s expertise in education, culture, natural, social and human sciences, and communication and information:

1. Policy formulation and review with the participation of youth.
Axis 1 - Policy formulation and review with the participation of youth - UNESCO Operational  Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.
Axis 2 - Capacity development for the transition to adulthood - UNESCO Operational  Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.
Axis 3 - Civil engagement, democratic participation and social innovation - UNESCO Operational  Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.



The implementation of the UNESCO Operational Strategy on Youth is also guided by the recommendations produced at the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum (UNESCO Paris, France, 29-31 October 2013).

Read the Outcome Document of the 8th UNESCO Youth Forum


UNESCO Operational Strategy on Youth 2014-2021.

 Events :
A celebration of International Youth Day will in the ECOSOC Chamber, UNHQ, from 10:30am-1:30pm on 12 August, 2014.
The event is co-organized by UN DESA’s Division for Social Policy and Development and the Office of the Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth.
The event will bring together young people, youth organizations, Member State representatives, civil society, and UN entities to discuss the issue of youth and mental-health in particular looking at issues such as the impact of stigma, discrimination and exclusion, on the local, country, and international levels.

How to participate?
Register for the event here
Watch the event live.

How to commemorate International Youth Day?

To commemorate the Day, you are encouraged to organize events or activities in your community.
  • Organize
    Hold forums, public discussions and information campaigns in support of young people, focusing on strengthening partnerships with and for young people.
  • Celebrate
    Plan and organize performances to showcase and celebrate how youth contribute to the societies in which they live, and how everyone, through partnerships with and for youth, can build a better world.
  • Map Events
    Are you planning an activity to mark International Youth Day 2014 in your community? Send details to youth@un.org and your event may be added to our world map of events.
  • Follow us
    Twitter: @UN4Youth
    Facebook: facebook.com/UN4Youth

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